Brain Health: What is the True Power?

The Bombardment of the Sensory Brain

Numerous articles and publications discuss the effects that our modern-day world and technology are having on our brains. I would like to simplify things right off the bat and state a little-discussed fact: every piece of sensory information to which you are exposed will re-wire your brain. Whether it is sound, light, touch, gravity, movement, smells, taste, etc.; stimulation to any of your body’s multiple receptors will fire neurons that send information to the brain. The old saying “neurons that firer together wire together” applies here. Now, the extent to which your neurons form new connections or fortify old connections depends on the frequency, intensity, and duration of the stimulation to the pathway. Bottom line, when it comes to activation and experience, the brain can learn to do things well (positive neuroplasticity) or it can learn to do things that aren’t good (negative neuroplasticity). In a world where we consciously like to believe we are in full control of things, it becomes an unpleasant fact that we are dependent and constantly manipulated by all the sensory information that bombards us every moment of our lives.

Let’s use light as an example. We know that if we were to flash light in front of a person with epilepsy it would not be a good thing. We also know that some people are sensitive to light and that others become depressed from lack of sunlight. Why is this? If you trace the pathways from the photoreceptors in our eyes, you would come to an area in the brainstem called the mesencephalon where roughly 10% of light stimulation is received. This area excites the rest of the brain and fires down to excite our sympathetic nervous system. Since no human brain is the same, each person’s response to a sensory stimulation is different. Someone with an over excited nervous system (ex. Epilepsy) cannot handle the stimulation. On the opposite end of the spectrum, someone with a underactive nervous system requires more light stimulation to function better. This is where a comprehensive neurological examination by someone who understands the nervous system is of paramount value.

In closing, all sensory information is excitatory. Consequently, are we getting too much or too little stimulation in our lives? Think about it; does our modern world increase or decrease our exposure to sensory information? The answer, of course, is we are now bombarded with sensory information and this is ramping up our brains. Also, think about what is going on around you in a calm setting versus a place that you need to protect yourself. One is lowly lit with calm flowing sounds and very little movement. The other is full of short frequent bursts of loud noises, flashes of light and chaotic movement around you. If you understand this then you can start to take control of your sensory overload. Sometimes the true power is turning the power off.

Dr. David R.A. Hardy, DC, DACBN, FABBIR
August 2, 2017

Functional Endocrinology of Ohio
Akron: 2800 S. Arlington Road, Akron, Ohio 44312 (330) 644-5488
Cleveland: 6200 Rockside Woods Blvd., Ste. 100, Independence, Ohio 44131 (216) 236-0060
Dr. Keith S. Ungar, Dr. Andrew Kender, Dr. David Hardy, Dr. Joseph Little, Chiropractic Physicians

To schedule an appointment, click here.

 

 

 

4 Questions to Consider if You Struggle With Anxiety, Depression or Other Brain-Related Condition”

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The Link Between Chiropractic Care and Brain Function

You may have heard of a vertebral subluxation and may even know that a good chiropractor can help with that. But, did you also know that a subluxation can impact brain function?

What is a Vertebral Subluxation you might ask?

A vertebral subluxation is a vertebra that has lost its normal position and/or motion in relation to its existing vertebrae. When this occurs the surrounding muscle, ligaments, and discs start to weaken much more readily due to compensation and overuse.

What can cause this you might ask?     Untitled design (87)

Subluxations can be caused by a physical, chemical, or emotional entity. A physical vertebral subluxation can occur due to acute trauma, disc degeneration, curvatures, spondylolisthesis, structural abnormalities, imbalanced spinal musculature, repetitive motions that affect the spine, bad posture, among other things. A chemical contributor can be in the form of poor nutritional habits, dietary changes, toxins, alcohol use, and drug abuse. The last factor is the emotional aspect, which includes stress. Stresses can deteriorate normal functions within the body creating a weakened immune system leading to greater risk of injury and disease.

How does this relate to our brain?

Heidi Haavik, Kelly Holt, Bernadette Murphy, along with others undertook a recent study published in the Journal of Neural Plasticity. The JOURNAL OF NEURAL PLASTICITY! “The research shows that when we adjust the spine, we significantly increase activity in the prefrontal cortex. “The study showed a change in brain function by almost 20% on average. The prefrontal cortex is the area of the brain where higher learning and cognition happens.” A chiropractic adjustment already helps with sensorimotor function (for the prevention of falls), improved joint position sense, improved muscle strength, better pelvic floor stability, and the ability to perform mental rotation of objects. We now know that along with all of this we can also improve our eye movements, spatial awareness, behavior, goal-oriented tasks, decision making, memory and attention, intelligence, the process behind pain, autonomic function, and motor control.  So… in turn getting regular chiropractic adjustments for spinal subluxations can help with brain function/activity.

How does this link with neurofeedback training?

This comes full circle when we combine chiropractic care with neurofeedback training. Along with the adjustment affecting the prefrontal cortex, the neurofeedback training conducted in clinic helps to fire off the different lobes and pathways in our brain as well. A good analogy in understanding neurofeedback is when comparing it to physical exercise. We challenge our body by applying various exercises and weights. Neurofeedback is similar in the sense that we are challenging our brain to learn and function better by focusing our attention on a goal-oriented task and training our brain to move away from undesirable states like anxiety and depression for example.

Dr. Kristy Narsinghani
Chiropractic Intern
August 28, 2016

Functional Endocrinology of Ohio
Akron: 2800 S. Arlington Road, Akron, Ohio 44312 (330) 644-5488
Cleveland: 6200 Rockside Woods Blvd., Ste. 100, Independence, Ohio 44131 (216) 236-0060
Dr. Keith S. Ungar, Dr. Andrew Kender, Dr. Robert Nichols, Dr. Jessica Eckman
Chiropractic Physicians

To schedule an appointment, click here.

http://circleofdocs.com/without-a-doubt-chiropractic-research-shows-adjusting-the-subluxated-spine-changes-brain-function/

Brain-Building: The Key to Longevity?

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4 Essential Facts You Need to Know About Neuroplasticity

In the last decade, it has become clear that our brain’s ability to function at its highest level is, at least partly, within our control.  Genetics and head trauma play a role but so does our environment, the foods we eat, and the quality of our daily brain workout. 

In 2014, on Father’s Day weekend, I was in a boating accident.  I was a passenger in a 4-seater SeaDoo jet boat driving in a no-wake zone.  A young inexperienced driver in a 27 foot speed boat struck us at full speed.  I had broken ribs and a concussion.  There is so much I could write about the effect of that accident on my life – about how it gave me a new perspective on things, about how I look at each day differently, and about how blessed I am to have the people in my life that supported me after the accident.  But, the scope of this article is to share with you the importance of neuroplasticity in a brain that is damaged by trauma, age, environmental factors and the failure to give the brain the attention it deserves and requires.

The word, “neuroplasticity” comes from the root words, “neuron” and “plastic.”  “Neuroplasticity refers to the potential that the brain has to reorganize by creating new neural pathways to adapt, as it needs.”[1]  The old school of thought was that the brain is static, except “during some critical developmental periods.”[2]  We now know that is not true.  Our brains are remarkable.  They can reorganize pathways, create new connections and even create new neurons throughout your lifetime if treated well. (Click Link to Tweet)

Here are the bare-bone facts about neuroplasticity.

  1. Neuroplasticity Occurs Under 2 Conditions:  “(1) during normal brain development when the immature brain first begins to process sensory information through adulthood (developmental plasticity and plasticity of learning and memory), and (2) as an adaptive mechanism to compensate for lost function and/or to maximize remaining functions in the event of brain injury.”[3]

2.  Cells that Fire Together, Wire Together.   “When people repeatedly practice an activity or access a memory, their neural networks — groups of neurons that fire together, creating electrochemical pathways — shape themselves according to that activity or memory.”[4]  Over time, “these connections become thick, hardy road maps that link various parts of the brain. When people stop practicing new things, the brain will eventually eliminate, or prune,” the connecting cells that formed the pathways.[5]  Thus, you must always continue to practice new things to create new pathways and to make sure the “map” in your brain will take you where you want to go.

3.  Our Senses are Closely Connected to Memory and Cognition.  Thus, a weakness in one of the brain’s pathways can effect one of more of your senses.

 For example, we all know that Alzheimer’s patients slowly lose their memories. One way this manifests is that they eat less food. Why? As it turns out, visual deficits are also a part of Alzheimer’s. People eat less because they can’t see the food as well. Another example is in normal age-related cognitive changes. As we grow older, we get more forgetful and distracted in large part because our brain does not process what we hear, see, and feel as well as it once did. The result is that we can’t store images of our experiences as clearly, and so have trouble using them and recalling them later.[6]

4.  Neuroplasticity is directly related to age.  The brain changes at all ages, “but different kinds of change are relevant at different ages.”[7]   The brain will change and rewire itself through its life in responds to stimulation of learning and experience. “As we age, the rate of change in the brain, or neu­ro­plas­tic­ity, declines but [it] does not come to a halt. In addi­tion, we now know that new neu­rons can appear in cer­tain parts of the brain up until the day we die.”[8]   We may increase our brain’s plasticity to try to slow down the aging process.

So what can you do to improve your brain’s function?

  1. Get evaluated by a good functional neurologist so that you can discover any brain weaknesses and any metabolic issues affecting your brain function. Click here to read our blog post about functional neurology and click on any of our doctors’ names below to read about their training.
  2. Engage in neurological therapies. Click here for a list of some of the therapies we use in our office.
  3. Have your brain-mapped and trained using neurofeedback. Click here to read our blog post about neurofeedback or here to visit our neurofeedback website.
  4. Meditate.  Click here to visit Dr. Joe Dispenza’s website to learn about how meditation changes the brain.
  5. Try one of the many brain-training “games” on-line like, Lumosity, Peak, Elevate, or Fit Brains. You can also get these on your phone as mobile apps.

The good news is that for most people, you can improve the brain’s neuroplasticity if you are capable of learning anything new, no matter how small.  Obviously, the level of improvement will depend on many factors. You will notice even greater improvement when you combine one or more of the action steps above.

As for me, I’ve done “all of the above” and will continue to work out both my body and my brain in hopes of living a long and healthy life.  I may also avoid boating for a while  🙂

Dr. Keith S. Ungar
May 17, 2015

www.balancingyourchemistry.com
Email: info@feohio.com
Functional Endocrinology of Ohio
Akron: 2800 S. Arlington Road, Akron, Ohio 44312 (330) 644-5488
Cleveland: 6200 Rockside Woods Blvd., Ste. 100, Independence, Ohio 44131 (216) 236-0060
Dr. Keith S. Ungar, and Dr. Andrew Kender, Chiropractic Physicians
Click here to make an appointment.

[1] http://www.whatisneuroplasticity.com
[2] http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2015/01/15/neuroplasticity-brain-health.aspx
[3] http://www.efpta.org/docs/NeuroplasticityMM-474891-29-04-2012.pdf
[4] http://www.edutopia.org/neuroscience-brain-based-learning-neuroplasticity
[5] Id.
[6] http://www.brainhq.com/brain-resources/brain-plasticity/what-is-brain-plasticity
[7] http://www.efpta.org/docs/NeuroplasticityMM-474891-29-04-2012.pdf
[8] http://sharpbrains.com/resources/1-brain-fitness-fundamentals/neuroplasticity-the-potential-for-lifelong-brain-development

3 Ways To Make Meditation Part of Your Morning Routine

Meditation   Meditation Can Actually Create More Time in Your Day 

Wouldn’t it be great if you could have just a few more hours in your day?  Time to spend with your family and friends?   Time to get to the gym (like you’ve been wanting to do for months)?  Time to do that remodeling project that’s been hanging over your head.  Time to read that book that’s been on your nightstand long enough to collect dust?  Or, just time to catch a few more zzzzz’s or watch the latest episode of House of Cards?  Can you really create time?

Recently, I attended a seminar hosted by Dr. Joe Dispenza, the author of Breaking the Habit of Being Yourself, and several other books.  Friends who had read all of his books and been to his seminars recommended Dr. Dispenza.  Have you ever known someone who is so full of joy and positive energy that you want to just be in the same room with them in hopes of absorbing even a fraction of it?  My friends who recommended Dr. Dispenza are those kind of people. So, of course, I logged on to Amazon.com immediately, ordered Dr. Dispenza’s book and read it in 2 days.[1]   Dr. Dispenza’s story is remarkable but this is not an article about him or his book – just the power of what he (and others) teach.  Mindfulness and being present was not a foreign concept to me but the science behind meditation and quantum thinking as taught by Dr. Dispenza really appealed to my analytical mind.  It also fit well with what I know from a scientific standpoint from working in a doctor’s office.  I had meditated for about 2 months before attending the seminar and at the end of the seminar weekend, I knew I had found something that could change my life.

First, I’d like to clear up a few misconceptions about meditation – that it’s only done by artsy types whose wardrobe consists of lots of flowy clothing and who are flexible enough to sit Indian-style on the floor for hours.  People from every walk of life meditate.  From famous actors[2] to business executives like Oprah Winfrey, Rupert Murdoch (Chairman and CEO of Newscorp), and Bill Ford (Chairman of Ford Motor).[3]  Even “regular” people experience the benefits of meditation, like fireman, police officers and soccer moms.[4]  Recently, the benefits of and science behind meditation hit the news and social media when Dan Harris of ABC News made public how meditation changed his life. [5]  Moreover, you can meditate sitting upright in any type of clothing!  I admit though that my PJs are my favorite meditation “outfit.”  There are lots of other myths about meditation you can read about here.[6]

One of the biggest objections people have about starting a meditation routine is the same objection that pops up about lots of things that will improve our lives, like exercising, eating right, reading more, etc.  I don’t have time!  I get it and I’m guilty of making that exclamation about meditation and lots of other things.  But what I found out is that meditation creates more time than it takes.   How?

  • Meditation reduces pain, accelerates cognition, and sharpens your concentration.[7] (Click to Tweet) How much more time would you have if you had improved productivity because you had less pain, understood more and were super focused and able to concentrate? Meditation actually changes your brain structure!  In fact, every time you redirect your thoughts from where they may have strayed back to the where they should be (your breath or wherever a directed meditation might suggest), you are improving your brain’s plasticity.[8]
  • Meditation reduces stress. (Click to Tweet)  How much more time would you have with a sufficient reduction in stress levels to make every minute more efficient?[9]
  • Meditation enhances your creativity.[10]  Click to Tweet) How much more time would you have if you could quickly and creatively solve life’s little (or big) problems?Meditation increases energy. How much time would you have if you could buzz between tasks with limitless energy?

It makes sense, then, that if you meditate in the morning, you can draw on all of that “power” throughout the day!  So, how do you fit this into your routine?

  1. It’s been established that you now have more time because you are more efficient, productive and energetic. Voila!
  1. Buy yourself a good set of headphones, find a good guided meditation[11] and start with 15 minutes before anyone gets up. It’s your “you” time.  Believe me, your family will be more than happy to leave you alone when they meet the new focused, energetic and joyful you!  As Dr. Joe Dispenza says in his book, Breaking the Habit of Being Yourself, “if you want to make changes you need to change what you are doing.” (Click to Tweet)

3. Prepare your mediation site the night before. Put your headphones and media player by your favorite chair. Wear your pajamas, don’t brush your teeth or wash your face. Just get up, make your way to your chair, put in the headphones, press play and get ready for an awesome start to your day.

I hope this article will help you to understand the benefits of meditation and how to fit it into your morning schedule.  I will be attending Dr. Dispenza’s Advanced Seminar in the end of this month. I am so excited to see how I can take my meditation to the next level and create the life I want.   I’ll be back to share what I learned.

So, besides meditating, what are you going to do with all the time you have created?

Caroline Boardman
February 22, 2016

Functional Endocrinology of Ohio
Akron: 2800 S. Arlington Road, Akron, Ohio 44312 (330) 644-5488
Cleveland: 6200 Rockside Woods Blvd., Ste. 100, Independence, Ohio 44131 (216) 236-0060
Dr. Keith S. Ungar and Dr. Andrew Kender, Chiropractic Physicians
www.balancingyourchemistry.com

[1] The book also has some exercises that take about 4 weeks to do.  I highly recommend doing them exactly as suggested.
[2] http://www.ranker.com/list/celebrities-who-meditate/celebrity-lists?format=SLIDESHOW&page=3
[3] http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/07/05/business-meditation-executives-meditate_n_3528731.html
[4] http://www.huffingtonpost.com/sharon-salzberg/meditation-practice-paradigm-shift_b_820138.html
[5] http://abcnews.go.com/WNN/video/dan-harris-meditation-path-happiness-22871879
[6] http://www.chopra.com/ccl/7-myths-of-meditation
[7] http://www.spring.org.uk/2013/11/10-remarkable-ways-meditation-helps-your-mind.php
[8] http://meditation-research.org.uk/2014/03/meditation-and-neuroplasticity-five-key-articles/
[9] http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/money/jobcenter/workplace/bruzzese/story/2012-07-08/meditation-helps-your-work/56071024/1
[10] http://www.lifehack.org/articles/productivity/how-meditation-can-help-improve-your-productivity.html
[11] http://www.the-guided-meditation-site.com or http://www.topguidedmeditations.com or www.drjoedispenza.com

6 Ways To Supercharge Your Memory

Memory  6 Ways to Supercharge Your Memory

­­What did I need at the grocery store?   What is his or her name?   Who was I supposed to call back?   Where do I need to be and when?   We all have suffered from time to time with memory problems.  But, we can supercharge our memories!  First, a little bit of background.

Memory loss is one of the first warning signs of cognitive decline.[1]  It can also be the result of a metabolic or other health issue.[2]  There are four 4 types of memory: Sensory, Short-Term, Working & Long-Term.[3] Sensory Memory is a very brief recall of a sensory experience, such as what we just saw or heard. Short-term memory is that brief period when you can recall information you were just exposed to from 30 seconds to a few days. Id.  The human mind’s ability to hold a limited amount of information in a very accessible state temporarily is called short-term memory states author, Nelson Cowan. (Cowan, 2009) Working memory is our brain’s ability to store a limited amount of information available just long enough to use it. (Heerema, 2014) Working memory helps you plan and carry out behavior. Long-term memory is a vast storage of knowledge and a record of earlier events. Long-term memories can range from a few days to decades. Id.

Memory is important in everyone’s day to day life. We cherish our memories and hope they will last forever. Did you know that even when it becomes harder for us to recall certain memories that they are not lost forever? Memories do not vanish; they are still being stored in your brain. However, our ability to access these memories can diminish over time. The brain’s incredible ability to reshape itself holds true when it comes to learning and memory. You can harness the natural power of neuroplasticity to increase your cognitive abilities, enhance your ability to learn new information, and improve your memory.[4]  When you notice early signs such as forgetting names, directions, or simple instructions it is time to get to work! Here are a few ways to help you exercise your brain and work on improving your ability to retrieve memory.

  1. Neurofeedback

For people who do not respond well to medications, or people looking for a natural alternative to pharmaceutical treatments, neurofeedback is a great option. Especially effective in a clinical setting where the clients can also receive cognitive and emotional support, neurofeedback targets the underlying disregulations in brain activity that can increase or cause clinical symptoms. [Click to Tweet] Neurfeedback promotes health brain activity by creating positive changes at the source of the problem. Clients can begin to experience the benefits of increased cognitive function and lowered stress levels. These changes help increase the speed and fluidity of retrieving memories.

  1. Water Your Brain

Drinking water is one of the best things you can do for your brain.  Your brain works like an electrical current. Dehydration causes the currency to become weak. [Click to Tweet] Researchers from the University of East London and the University of Westminster in the UK analyzed particular areas of the participants’ brain, including reaction time, verbal recognition memory, visual memory and learning.[5]  They found that participants who drank around three cups of water just before completing tests had a 14% increased reaction time compared with those who did not drink any water. Id.

  1. Brain Games

There are plenty of fun ways to help train your brain to recall memories quicker and easier. With today’s technology, we have access to endless websites and cellphone apps that strengthen your brain. One of the most well-known websites is Luminosity, which offers a simple online tool with games that exercise core cognitive abilities. You can use Luminosity from a computer, tablet, or cellphone for iOS (iPhones) or Android operating systems.

  1. Work Out Your Hands

Memory, like muscular strength, requires you to “use it or lose it.” The more you work out your brain, the better you’ll be able to process and remember information. [Click to Tweet] The best brain exercises break your routine and challenge you to use and develop new brain pathways. Activities that require using your hands are a great way to exercise your brain. (Smith, 2015) Playing a musical instrument, juggling, enjoying a game of ping-pong (table tennis), making pottery, knitting, or needlework are activities that exercise the brain by challenging hand-eye coordination, spatial-temporal reasoning, and creativity. (Smith, 2015)

  1. Play Games
  • Picture Memory
  • Matching Pairs (Match the Pictures)
  • Matching Pairs (Match the Words)
  • Universal Crossword
  • Sudoku Daily

6.  Just Say No to Technology

When the working memory is experiencing digital overload, it’s like a glass of water overflowing. According to Tony Schwartz, author of The Way We’re Working Isn’t Working, as explained in an interview with The Huffington Post in June:

“It’s like having water poured into a glass continuously all day long, so whatever was there at the top has to spill out as the new water comes down. We’re constantly losing the information that’s just come in — we’re constantly replacing it, and there’s no place to hold what you’ve already gotten. It makes for a very superficial experience; you’ve only got whatever’s in your mind at the moment. And it’s hard for people to metabolize and make sense of the information because there’s so much coming at them and they’re so drawn to it. You end up feeling overwhelmed because what you have is an endless amount of facts without a way of connecting them into a meaningful story.”[6]

I hope this article gives you some useful information to help you recharge your memory. Now, put this list somewhere you can find it so you don’t forget to carry out some of these ideas.

Missty Klinger
April 4, 2015

For more information, visit our website: www.balancingyourchemistry.com

Functional Endocrinology of Ohio
Akron: 2800 S. Arlington Road, Akron, Ohio 44312 (330) 644-5488
Cleveland: 6200 Rockside Woods Blvd., Ste. 100, Independence, Ohio 44131 (216) 236-0060
Dr. Keith S. Ungar and Dr. Andrew Kender, Chiropractic Physicians

To Make An Appointment, Click Here.

[1] Cowan, N. (2009). What are the differences between long-term, short-term, and working memory? Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2657600/
[2] http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000683.htm
[3] Heerema,  E. (2014). 4 Types of Memory: Sensory, Short-Term, Working & Long-Term. Retrieved from http://alzheimers.about.com/od/symptomsofalzheimers/a/4-Types-Of-Memory-Sensory-Short-Term-Working-And-Long-Term.htm
[4] Smith, M. (2015). How to Improve Your Memory. Retrieved from http://www.helpguide.org/articles/memory/how-to-improve-your-memory.htm
[5] Whiteman, H. (2013). Drinking water boosts your brain’s reaction time.
http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/263648.php
[6] http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/12/11/technology-changes-memory_n_4414778.html

Graphic courtesy of: http://multibriefs.com/briefs/exclusive/0919memory.jpg

 

10 Ways to Improve Your Memory

 

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Remember when you used to remember

everything?  You can get your memory back.

How do I improve memory? That’s a big question for many people today as more and more people have trouble recovering information from their brain. Technology is a great thing. We get information at the speed of our fingertips. This includes getting directions, calling a person on their phone, or finding an address. Technology has made all this much simpler, but it has had an effect on how we “work-out” our brains. I am showing my age, but when I was growing up, I had phone numbers memorized.  I was able to look at a map, yes, a paper map, and could remember the routes.  I remembered addresses or was able to get out the big old phone book out and look up addresses. Today, kids keep their memories sharpened by playing Mortal Combat on the X-box and remembering the codes to, “rip the spine out of your opponent.”
They say you can’t treat an old-dog new tricks. This is wrong. The brain can adapt to new information, no matter what your age. This is due to Neuroplasticity. With the right stimulation, your brain can create new neural pathways, or wake up neurons along pathways that have become dormant. At any age, neuroplasticity is a possible and wonderful system the brain harnesses. [Click to Tweet].
So let’s look at some ways that anyone can improve their memory:
  1. You can work on those crossword puzzles that are in your daily newspaper, or in those small books you can get at most stores.
  1. Word searches are another exercise you can use to help keep your mind sharp.
  2. The fun game of Concentration is something fun and simple you can do to improve brain power.
  3. Getting the proper amount of sleep, “The truth is that over 95% of adults need between 7.5 to 9 hours of sleep every night to avoid sleep deprivation. Even skimping on a few hours makes a difference. Memory, creativity, problem-solving abilities, and critical thinking skills are all compromised.” [1]
  1. Try to keep your stress in check. Over time, stress releases cortisol which can destroy brain cells and affect our hippocampus. This is the area of the brain where new memories are formed and retrieval of old memory occurs. In our clinic, we are able to tell the people who may have memory issues by their cortisol load and circadian rhythm. The circadian rhythm is your sleep wake cycle.
  1. Have a diet that helps your brain. “Get your omega-3’s. Research shows that omega-3 fatty acids are particularly beneficial for brain health. Fish is a particularly rich source of omega-3, especially cold water “fatty fish” such as salmon, tuna, halibut, trout, mackerel, sardines, and herring.”[2] Another way to boost omega-3’s is to eat more fruits and vegetables.
  2. Learn something new. Remember when I used the old phrase, “you can’t teach an old dogs new tricks?” That is absolutely false.   Older people are taking it upon themselves to learn new things all the time.  More older people are going back to college. When I was in Chiropractic school, we had a gentleman who was an ambassador, taking classes who was in his sixties. Alfred was an amazing guy. He got his degree in Chiropractic in his mid-sixties.
  1. Exercise, even if it’s a little. “Exercise encourages your brain to work at optimum capacity by stimulating nerve cell to multiply, strengthening their interconnections and protecting them from damage.”[3]
  1. If you’re a computer person, then try the site Luminosity on your desktop or Ipad. It has lots of fun games to help you improve your memory.
  1. Make sure you have a healthy gut. “Your gut is your “second brain,” and your gut bacteria transmits information to your brain via the vagus nerve, the tenth cranial nerve that runs from your brain stem into your enteric nervous system (the nervous system of your gastrointestinal tract).[4] There is a close relationship between normal gut flora and brain heath. [Click to Tweet] “Quite simply, your gut health can impact your brain function, psyche, and behavior, as they are interconnected and interdependent in a number of different ways.”[5] Probiotics are also beneficial for your brain health.
So, I hope this helps many of you increase your brain power no matter what your age is. The brain is a remarkable thing, keep using it. Like the old saying goes – use it or lose it!
Dr. David Starkey D.C.
July 27, 2015
www.balancingyourchemistry.com
Functional Endocrinology of Ohio
Akron: 2800 S. Arlington Road, Akron, Ohio 44312 (330) 644-5488
Cleveland: 6200 Rockside Woods Blvd., Ste. 100, Independence, Ohio 44131 (216) 236-0060
Dr. Keith S. Ungar, Dr. David Starkey and Dr. Andrew Kender, Chiropractic Physicians
To make an appointment, click here.

[1] http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2014/04/24/memory-improvement-tricks.aspx
[2] Id.
[3] Id.
[4] Id.
[5] Id.