Concussions: A Mom’s Perspective

It’s official, the 2017 High School Football Season has begun!  Watching my Son play football under the Friday night lights is one of my favorite things to do this time of year. His commitment, his dedication, and his hard work are paying off. Involving our children in sports has always been a priority in our family.    The commitment provides an opportunity to gain greater self-awareness, develop better social skills and commit to a consistent exercise regimen. Becoming actively involved in a sport provides a wealth of health benefits.  Playing a sport can improve efficient functioning of the heart, improve blood circulation, lower hypertension, and lower stress levels. Being part of a team also teaches so many valuable life lessons such as commitment, comradery and mental and physical toughness.  We can do great things when we keep up our physical and mental well-being!

  Although I enjoy watching my son progress and excel at his favorite sport, the sport itself is downright dangerous.  I worry about the next practice, the next play, the next hit or even the after effects of it all.  Last season, I received the call that my son, during practice, took a very hard hit to the head.  It was the second week of football practice and already my son had been hit so hard that he suffered a loss of consciousness, confusion, blurred vision, and a constant headache that would not ease up.   Although there were very real signs and symptoms of a concussion in my son’s case, that may not always be the case.  Often times, the signs and symptoms are subtle and are not always apparent immediately.   Concussions can happen in an instant. Yet they can have a lasting impact on a young athlete.  It is Important to know the warning signs and follow through with a treatment plan to reduce long-term effects. Your brain can heal itself.  However, just because your athlete may feel better doesn’t mean that the brain is healed.  According to Dr. David Hardy, Chiropractic Neurologist at Functional Endocrinology of Ohio, the brain takes time to heal.  Often times the brain compensates during the process and if not properly diagnosed and treated may lead to a more severe concussion to follow often resulting in worse damage than the first.

Be aware of the signs:

  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Sensitivity to light and sound
  • Headaches
  • Blurred vision
  • Dizziness or confusion
  • Trouble thinking or remembering
  • Speech problems
  • Feeling sleepy or a change in sleep pattern
  • Loss of consciousness (This doesn’t always have to happen)

Know what to do:

  • Seek medical attention, get checked out to assess the extent of the concussion. Become as involved as possible in the care and management plan to help prevent or lessen the long-term effects or injury.
  • Rest
  • Maintain a healthy diet
  • Seek neuro-rehabilitation. A trained functional neurologist is the best.
  • Keep open communication with your player. Make sure they know how important it is to communicate all symptoms

We are very fortunate to play for a high school program that provides our players with state of the art equipment and a professionally trained staff.  At the start of the season, players were all given base line testing or a preseason physical of the brain which records the normal neurological state.  In Sam’s case, the high school athletic department, trainer and coaching staff followed the proper protocol.  I know that I can’t shelter or protect my son but I will make sure to be equipped to recognize the signs and symptoms and know what to do in the case of an unfortunate head trauma or even a hard hit.

The most important way to equip your player is to encourage that they do not hide their symptoms.  Make sure that they know to report their symptoms to the high school trainer, coaching staff and parents.  Make sure that your player is always wearing protective gear.  If signs or symptoms are present, get checked out.  Whenever there is doubt, encourage them to sit out.

I feel very fortunate to work for a team of doctors committed to overall health and well-being.  This year, Dr. David Hardy, DC, DACNB, FABBIR joined our team at Functional Endocrinology of Ohio with an extensive background in Functional Neurology.  As an athlete himself, who competed in competitive rugby, high school football, and basketball, as well as Ironman competitions, his passion is treating all brain-related conditions but especially TBIs and concussions.  Even though I will always worry about that next practice, next hit, next play or even the after effects of it all, my doctors have educated my son and me about the proper protocols.  Because of this knowledge and guidance, I will know what to look for and how to aid in the recovery process.

When it comes to concussions, be aware and use your head!

Joy Vale
Patient Care Coordinator
September 6, 2017

Functional Endocrinology of Ohio

Akron: 2800 S. Arlington Road, Akron, Ohio 44312 (330) 644-5488
Cleveland: 6200 Rockside Woods Blvd., Ste. 100, Independence, Ohio 44131 (216) 236-0060
Dr. Keith S. Ungar, Dr. Andrew Kender, Dr. David Hardy, Dr. Joseph Little, Chiropractic Physicians

To schedule an appointment, click here.

 

Feed Your Football Fans The Healthy Way – 6 Great Recipes!

I can hardly wait!  “The Ohio State Buckeyes“ kick off their season on August 31st.  It’s bad I know, but I’ve been doing a count down since it was 100 days out.   I’ve made the decision to eat healthily and offer healthy snack options during football season. I’ve been collecting recipes, and here are some of my favorites.

Avocado Hummus

Nutritional profileDairy Free, Egg Free, Nut-Free, Soy-Free, Diabetic Appropriate, Gluten-Free,  Heart Healthy, High Fiber

Ingredients

  • 1 (15 ounces) Can no-salt-added chickpeas
  • 1 ripe avocado, halved and pitted
  • 1 cup fresh cilantro leaves
  • ¼ cup tahini
  • ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
  • ¼ cup lemon juice
  • 1 clove of garlic
  • 1 teaspoon ground cumin
  • ½ teaspoon salt

Directions

Drain chickpeas, reserving 2 tablespoons of the liquid. Transfer the chickpeas and the reserved liquid to a food processor. Add avocado, cilantro, tahini, oil, lemon juice, garlic, cumin, and salt. Puree until very smooth. Serve with veggie chips, veggie, gluten-free crackers

Slow-Cooker Braised Pork with Salsa

Nutritional profile:  Gluten-Free,  Healthy Aging, Healthy Immunity, Low Added Sugars, Low-Calorie, Low Carbohydrate,  Low Sodium,

Ingredients

  • 3 pounds boneless pork shoulder, or butt
  • 1 ½ cups prepared tomatillo salsa
  • 1 ¾ cups reduced-sodium chicken broth
  • 1 medium onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 teaspoon cumin seeds, or ground cumin
  • 3 plum tomatoes, (1/2 pound), thinly sliced
  • ½ cup chopped fresh cilantro, divided
  • ½ cup reduced-fat sour cream

Directions

  1. Trim and discard pork surface fat. Cut meat apart following layers of fat around muscles; trim and discard fat. Cut into 2-inch chunks and rinse with cold water. Place in a 5- or 6-quart slow cooker. Turn heat to high.
  2. Combine salsa, broth, onion and cumin seeds in a saucepan and bring to a boil over high heat. Pour over the meat. Add tomatoes and mix gently. Put the lid on and cook until the meat is pull-apart tender, 6 to 7 hours.
  3. With a slotted spoon, transfer the pork to a large bowl; cover and keep warm. Pour the sauce and vegetables into a large skillet; skim fat. Bring to a boil over high heat. Boil, skimming froth from time to time, for about 20 minutes, to intensify flavors and thicken slightly. Add the pork and ¼ cup cilantro; heat through.
  4. To serve, ladle into bowls and garnish each serving with a dollop of sour cream and a sprinkling of the remaining ¼ cup cilantro.

 Sriracha-Buffalo Cauliflower Bites

Nutritional profileGluten-Free, Egg-Free,  Soy-Free, Nut-Free, Low Added Sugars, Low-Calorie, Low Added Sugar, High Fiber, Low Carbohydrate

Ingredients

  • 8 cups 1 ½-inch cauliflower florets
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • ¼ teaspoon kosher salt
  • 2 tablespoons hot sauce, such as Frank’s RedHot
  • 1-2 tablespoons Sriracha Sauce
  • 1 tablespoons butter, melted
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 450°F. Coat a large rimmed baking sheet with cooking spray.
  2. Toss cauliflower, oil, and salt in a large bowl. Spread on the prepared baking sheet; reserve the bowl. Roast the cauliflower until it’s starting to soften and brown on the bottom, about 15 minutes.
  3. Meanwhile, combine hot sauce, sriracha to taste, butter and lemon juice in the large bowl. Add the roasted cauliflower and toss to coat. Return the cauliflower to the baking sheet and continue roasting until hot, about 5 minutes more.

Slow Cooker Honey-Orange Chicken Drumsticks

Nutritional profile: Gluten-Free, Healthy Aging, Healthy Immunity, Low-Calorie, Low Added Sugar, High Fiber, Low Carbohydrate

Ingredients

  • 1/3 cup honey
  • 2 teaspoons orange zest
  • 2 tablespoons Orange Juice (Pulp Free)
  • 3 tablespoons Tamari
  • 3 cloves garlic minced
  • 3 tablespoons minced fresh ginger
  • 1 tablespoon Rice Vinegar
  • ¼ teaspoon crushed red pepper
  • 12 medium chicken drumsticks (3-31/2 lbs) skinned * see tip
  • 2 tablespoons fresh cilantro
  • 2 teaspoons toasted sesame seeds

Directions

  1. Combine honey, orange zest, orange juice, tamari, garlic, ginger, vinegar and crushed red pepper in a small bowl.
  2. Coat a 5 to 6-quart slow cooker with cooking spray. Add drumsticks, pour in the sauce and mix to coat. Cover and cook until an instant-read thermometer registers 165°F when inserted into the thickest part of the meat without touching bone, 2 to 3 hours on High or 4 hours on Low.
  3. Transfer the drumsticks to a bowl. Very carefully pour the liquid from the slow cooker into a medium skillet. Bring to a boil over high heat. Boil until reduced and syrupy, 10 to 15 minutes. Pour the sauce over the drumsticks and stir to coat. Serve sprinkled with cilantro and sesame seeds.
  • Tip: To remove the skin from chicken drumsticks, grip the skin from the meaty end of the drumstick with a paper towel and pull down toward the exposed bone until it comes off completely. 

Cran-Razzy

Nutritional profileGluten-Free, Low-Fat, Low-Calorie

Ingredients

  • ½ cup fresh or frozen raspberries, for garnish
  • 2 cups cranberry-raspberry juice
  • 2 cups seltzer
  • 2 tablespoons lime juice, plus 4 wedges for garnish
  • 6 ounces ( ¾ cup) vodka

Directions

  1. If using fresh raspberries, freeze them in a single layer for about 1 hour (or overnight) before proceeding with Step 2.
  2. Combine cranberry-raspberry juice, seltzer, lime juice and vodka in a pitcher. Divide among 4 ice-filled glasses. Garnish with frozen raspberries and lime wedges.

Spiced Chickpeas

 

Nutritional profileGluten-Free,  Low added sugars, Low-Calorie, High Fiber, Vegan, Vegetarian

Ingredients

  • 1 15-ounce can chickpeas, rinsed
  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • 2 teaspoons ground cumin
  • 1 teaspoon dried marjoram
  • ¼ teaspoon ground allspice
  • ¼ teaspoon salt

Directions

  1. Position rack in upper third of oven; preheat to 450°F.
  2. Blot chickpeas dry and toss in a bowl with oil, cumin, marjoram, allspice, and salt. Spread on a rimmed baking sheet. Bake, stirring once or twice until browned and crunchy, 25 to 30 minutes. Let cool on the baking sheet for 15 minutes.

Here are some websites that you can find plenty of healthy snacks for the games.

Nancy Boardman
August 23, 2017

Functional Endocrinology of Ohio
Akron: 2800 S. Arlington Road, Akron, Ohio 44312 (330) 644-5488
Cleveland: 6200 Rockside Woods Blvd., Ste. 100, Independence, Ohio 44131 (216) 236-0060
Dr. Keith S. Ungar, Dr. Andrew Kender, Dr. David Hardy, Dr. Joseph Little, Chiropractic Physicians

To schedule an appointment, click here.

https://greatist.com/health/super-bowl-recipes-snacks
http://www.cookinglight.com/entertaining/holidays-occasions/football-party-recipes#healthy-football-recipes
http://www.health.com/health/gallery/0,,20338949,00.html#dips-desserts-and-more-1

Fall, Football and Gluten Free Beer?

gluten-free-beer-shootout-gear-patrol-lead-full-2

Is There Really a Gluten Free Beer that Tastes Like Beer?  Yes!

It’s that time of year – football season!  Here some ideas about how to cheer on your team if you have a gluten allergy or sensitivity.

By now everyone who has read my blogs knows that I am a HUGE Ohio State Buckeye fan. As such, Fall, which has always been my favorite season, is even better.   In my book, the perfect way to spend a Saturday afternoon in the Fall is in front of the TV (preferably outside) with a cold beer and other crazy fans, watching my Buckeyes take the field.   When I was diagnosed with a gluten sensitivity a few years back, I thought my Saturdays would never be exactly the same again.  I was wrong.

There are gluten-free beers that taste like beer and many of them are found at your local sports bar.  Here are a few that I like that are readily available.

Redbridge  Redbridge.  Budweiser makes this beer and, a such, it is in almost every sports bar.  It tastes like a Budweiser – go figure!

Here are some other great options:

estrella-daura-326 glutenator-326 new-grist-beer-646 new-planet-raspberry-326

And my favorite (drum roll please) . . . Comes in 3 great brews: lager, pale ale and an IPA.  omission-lager-646

Here are some other great articles about gluten-free beer:

http://www.bonappetit.com/drinks/beer/slideshow/10-gluten-free-beers-that-actually-taste-good

http://www.mensfitness.com/nutrition/what-to-drink/gluten-free-beers-you%E2%80%99ve-gotta-try

http://thebeerdiaries.tv/beer-guide/gluten-free-guide/

http://www.shape.com/healthy-eating/healthy-drinks/12-gluten-free-beers-really-do-taste-great

Check them out and Go Bucks!

Do you have a gluten-free beer that you love?

Caroline Boardman
October 14, 2015

www.balancingyourchemistry.com

Functional Endocrinology of Ohio
Akron: 2800 S. Arlington Road, Akron, Ohio 44312 (330) 644-5488
Cleveland: 6200 Rockside Woods Blvd., Ste. 100, Independence, Ohio 44131 (216) 236-0060
Dr. Keith S. Ungar and Dr. Andrew Kender, Chiropractic Physicians

To schedule an appointment, click here.

www.omissionbeer.com