Ease Anxiety, Depression and Addiction Holistically Through Restorative Yoga Poses

Just a few moments spent in stillness and silence will promote calmness and clarity!

Restorative yoga provides healing for the mind and body. A restorative practice offers the opportunity, with its long-held poses, to sit with our negative experiences and breathe through the emotionally turbulent times and negative thought patterns.   Restorative yoga promotes a physical and mental balance to prevent stress and anxiety or simply calm your mind to help regain a healthy focus. It also allows you to explore what happens when you release the tension your body habitually holds.  These yoga sequences typically involve 5 or 6 poses, held for lengths of time that allow you to completely relax and rest.  Held for at least 5 minutes or more, the physical postures, breathing techniques, and meditation or relaxation can positively improve your quality of life.

The top 10 Benefits of Restorative Yoga:

  1. Stress relief
  2. Lowers anxiety
  3. Releases tension
  4. Increases Brain Function
  5. Stimulates Self-Healing
  6. Lowers Heart Rate
  7. Alleviates Depression
  8. Improves sleep
  9. Increases Energy
  10. Awakens Peace

Below are 6 of my favorite restorative poses:

Easy Pose: This pose is a great way to start.  Position yourself on your mat.  Cross your shins and widen your knees.  Sit up tall lengthening your spine.  Close your eyes and gently rest your hands on your knees.  Take 3 deep breathes in and out to the count of 3. The key is to focus on your breath to help your mind begin to relax. Continue to breathe deep cleansing breaths. Breathe deeply in through the nose as if you are smelling a beautiful rose.  Hold at the top for 4-8 seconds and release by breathing out through the nose as if you’re fogging up a mirror. The easy pose promotes an inner calm and also allows you to focus on your breath and the present moment.

Childs Pose: Begin by folding your legs under you, touching your big toes together and sit on back your heels, reach your hands forward as you lay your chest on or between your thighs.  Separate your knees as wide as your hips.  Continue reaching forward to feel the added stretch of your spine.  Take 5 deep, calming breaths.  Childs pose allows you to relax your neck, shoulders, and spine all at once.
Legs up the wall: Set yourself up with a comfortable space. Place the end of your mat directly in touch with the wall. Begin by shimming your hips a few inches from the wall then start walking your feet up the wall until your body is in a slight  L-shaped position.  Make any adjustments needed to make yourself comfortable and relaxed.  Maybe place a pillow under your head or let your arms rest out to the sides or on your belly.  At this point, you will begin to focus on your breathing.  Take a deep, slow inhale through your nose, hold at the top, and then a deep, slow exhale out the nose.  Relax for at least 5-15 minutes. This pose allows the mind and body to relax, relieving stress and tension. The semi-supine aspect of the pose combined with invigorating breaths leads to a slowing down within your body and elicits a relaxation response by lowering your heart rate.

Bridge Pose: While lying on your back, bend both knees and place the feet flat on the floor hip-width apart.  Slide your arms alongside the body with palms facing down.  Your fingertips should be lightly touching the heels.  Press the feet into the floor, inhale and lift the hips up rolling the spine off of the floor.  Gently, squeeze the knees together keeping them hip-width apart.  Press down into the arms and shoulders to lift up the chest. Maybe draw your hands together interlocking the fingers.  Engage the legs and buttocks to lift the hips higher.  Take a deep, invigorating breath, in through the nose as if you are smelling a beautiful flower, hold at the top and then breathe out through the nose as if to fog up a mirror as you gently release and slowly roll the spine back to the floor.  This pose lengthens and strengthens the spine stimulating the endocrine and nervous system.

Cat/Cow Pose: Start on your mat in a tabletop position, neutral spine, with shoulders over the wrists and hips over the knees.  Fingers will point forward and the tops of the feet resting on the floor shoelace side down.  Take a big deep inhale.  On the exhale, round up your spine towards the ceiling pulling the belly button to the spine.  Tuck the chin towards your chest releasing the neck.  This is the cat-like shape.  On your exhale, arch your back and let the belly relax.  Lift your head and tailbone towards the sky. Be careful not to put too much tension on the neck. This is the cow part of the pose.  Begin to flow with the breath between these two poses, inhaling for cow pose and exhaling for cat pose. Repeat for at least 10 rounds.  This pose will relieve back and neck tension.
Savasana: Although it may seem the easiest pose it often is the most difficult.  The art of relaxation is harder than it looks!  Savasana is the practice of gradually relaxing one body part at a time, on muscle at a time, and one thought at a time.  Rest your entire body on your mat.  Extend your arms and legs outward from the torso evenly and symmetrically.  Take a mental scan of your body from head to toe releasing any tension in each body part from your eyes to your jaw to your shoulders, knees, and toes.  Let your body grow heavier with each exhalation.  The goal is to relax with attention, to stay conscious and alert while being at ease.  Just breathe.  This pose, practiced regularly, conditions the body to release stress and improve your sense of physical and emotional well-being.
Yoga has become increasingly popular in today’s busy society providing a retreat from the chaos and busyness and everyday stressors.   It is important to find healthy coping skills that will work for you. Yoga offers peace and tranquility and can ease the symptoms of anxiety, depression and addictive behaviors. Devoting time to your mat allows you the time to relax and calm your thoughts, focus on living in the moment, and take care of you in a healthy, holistic way.  Yoga works with the nature of the mind, the nature of being a human, how emotions live in our bodies, how they affect our behavior and our minds.  I urge you to try a new approach. Relax and Rejuvenate.  Find what works for you!
Namaste.  The light in me honors the light in you,

Joy Vale
Patient Care Coordinator
November 22, 2017

Functional Endocrinology of Ohio
Akron: 2800 S. Arlington Road, Akron, Ohio 44312 (330) 644-5488
Cleveland: 6200 Rockside Woods Blvd., Ste. 100, Independence, Ohio 44131 (216) 236-0060
Dr. Keith S. Ungar, Dr. David Hardy, Dr. Joseph Little, Chiropractic Physicians

To schedule an appointment, click here.

What Are the Health Benefits of Restorative Yoga?” Power Yoga, 31 May 2017, poweryoga.com/blog/health-benefits-restorative-yoga/.
“10 Best Yoga Poses to Grow Taller.” BeautyGlimpse, 10 May 2014, http://www.beautyglimpse.com/10-best-yoga-poses-grow-taller/.
Orenstein, Beth W. “8 Yoga Poses for Beginners.” EverydayHealth.com, 26 Mar. 2013, www.everydayhealth.com/fitness-pictures/yoga-poses-for-beginners.aspx.
“Legs-up-the-Wall Pose.” Inspiredhealthcoach.wordpress.com, 3 Mar. 2011, inspiredhealthcoach.wordpress.com/2011/03/03/trouble-sleeping/legs-up-the-wall-pose/.
Paul, Jasmina. “The Yoga Bridge Pose: 5 Seldom-Known Benefits.” Ayurveda Natural Anti-Aging, Mind, Body Health, 14 June 2015, www.bodhyhealth.com/blog/2015/04/yoga-bridge-pose-benefits/.
Sulpizio, Lorri. “Benefits of the Cat-Cow Pose.” Team Better, blog.teambetter.com/benefits-of-the-cat-cow-pose/.

Neurofeedback is Proven Effective: The Research

Untitled design (49)

Can You Really Retrain Your Brain?

If you follow the Realwellnessdoc, then you know that we offer neurofeedback in our office.  We’ve posted several blogs describing neurofeedback and explaining how it works.  Despite this, you may wonder about the research behind it and whether it would work for you.  So for you research-geeks, here are some links to some great articles from reliable sources discussing neurofeedback and its efficacy for depression, anxiety, ADD, seizures, PTSD, sleep problems, migraines, and other brain-related conditions.

From the Mental Health Daily: the efficacy of neurofeedback and anxiety disorders.

From the Journal of Pediatrics: Neurofeedback provides a long-term solution to ADD that continues post-treatment.  

A NASA researcher discusses using neurofeedback to help kids with ADD. 

Neurofeedback: A Brain Flex to Help Olympic Athletes Train for a Better Performance

From the American Board of Sports Psychology: Neurofeedback for the Enhancement of Athletic Performance and Improved Balance

The role of neurofeedback on epileptic seizures

From the Clinical EEG and Neuroscience Magazine: The role of neurofeedback and migraines.

The role of neurofeedback on Traumatic Brain Injury/Posttraumatic Stress Symptoms in OEF/OIF Veterans

Neurofeedback’s role in reducing depression, fatigue, and other problematic symptoms in patients with traumatic brain injury.  

Neurofeedback and depression and sleep problems.

Neurofeedback and sleep problems

If you would like to find out more, come to one of our free lectures on the topic in our Independence office on April 4th at 6:00, April 13th at 9:15 and April 27th at 11:45. The address is below.

Click here to register. We will be conducting a tour of our neurofeedback department on the April 4th and April 27th dates.

I hope to see you there!

Caroline Boardman
March 30, 2016

www.balancingyourchemistry.com

Functional Endocrinology of Ohio
Akron: 2800 S. Arlington Road, Akron, Ohio 44312 (330) 644-5488
Cleveland: 6200 Rockside Woods Blvd., Ste. 100, Independence, Ohio 44131 (216) 236-0060
Dr. Keith S. Ungar and Dr. Andrew Kender, Chiropractic Physicians

To schedule an appointment, click here.

10 Reasons To Turn Your Body Upside Down Every Day!

Untitled design (43)

Act Like a Kid and Go Upside Down – Your Body Will Love It!

Did you know that Hippocrates use inversion exercises dating all the way back to 400 B.C.? Chiropractor Dr. Robert Martin introduced inversion therapies to America by in the 1960’s. Inversion is any activity done upside down to stretch and lengthen the spine. [2] It is mainly used to providing pain relief and reduce stress from a person’s back and neck. [2] Some inversion exercises include specific yoga poses, some Pilate’s moves and inversion therapies performed with gravity-defying machines such as inversion tables and chairs.

I use to attend a breathing and meditation yoga class every week. During this class I noticed the instructor would make a point of having us do at least one inverted or upside-down position. After class one day I asked her if there was a meaning behind this. The instructor went told me about how healthy it was for your heart and mind to almost “reset” the blood that is circulating in your body. It peaked my interest so I looked into the benefits of going inverted and wanted to share them with you.

Ten Great Reasons to Invert Yourself

1.) Relieves spinal pressure by increases the space between individual vertebrae and lengthening the spine. This helps reverse the compressing effects of running, jumping, sitting, and standing

2.) Strengthens your ligaments to help prevent bones accidentally breaking. [3]

3.) Improve circulation in the cardiovascular and lymphatic systems. [1]

4.) Increased blood flow moves metabolic waste such as lactic acid out of tissue more efficiently. This helps detox the body and strengths your immune system. [Click The Link to Tweet] [2]

5.) Increase blood circulation to the brain which gives brain cells more oxygen. This increased blood flow helps improve memory, concentration, and awareness. [2] Inversion may also be helpful with recovering from traumatic brain injuries (ask your doctor before trying).

6.) Reversing gravity rushes nutrients and oxygen to your face which removes toxicity including acne. [Click the Link To Tweet] It also stimulates your facial capillaries and hair follicles.

7.) It will make you happier!  Inversion flushes your adrenal glands causing them to release neurotransmitters and endorphins which make you feel happy. [Click Link to Tweet] These happy hormones can help counteract depression, mood swings and seasonal affective disorder. [2]  Upside Down Smiley Face

8.) It also helps reduce anxiety and anxiousness by stimulating your parasympathetic nervous system, which produces feelings of relaxation and calmness.

9.) Helps move along the digestion process in your colon and can help relieve forms of indigestion.

10.) Relieves muscle tension for a better night sleep. A study conducted by LJ Nose showed muscle tension declined by more than 35 percent within 10 seconds of inverting. [2]

Different Ways to Invert Yourself

  • Yoga poses that involve any movement where your legs are over your head or your head is pointing downward.
    • Downward facing dog             Yoga Pose 10
    • Supported shoulder-stand
    • Supported head stand
    • Plow pose (advanced yogis only)
  • Using an inversion table, bar, or chair
  • Doing a Handstand

*PLEASE READ: “Inversion exercises have been found to increase both blood pressure and pressure behind the eye in healthy people. Because of these findings, inversion therapy is not recommended for those with high blood pressure, glaucoma or spinal instability and patients taking anticoagulants or aspirin therapy. Inversion therapy is also not recommended for pregnant women, stroke patients, and those with detached retinas. Seek the advice of a qualified health professional before beginning any program involving inversion exercise.” 2.

I hope you found this information useful and interesting. Please share below any inverted exercises you practice and how they have helped your life.

Missty L. Klinger
March 9, 2016

www.balancingyourchemistry.com

Functional Endocrinology of Ohio
Akron: 2800 S. Arlington Road, Akron, Ohio 44312 (330) 644-5488
Cleveland: 6200 Rockside Woods Blvd., Ste. 100, Independence, Ohio 44131 (216) 236-0060
Dr. Keith S. Ungar and Dr. Andrew Kender, Chiropractic Physicians

To schedule an appointment, click here.

*image https://www.flickr.com/photos/jerkhaircut/5451931890/galleries/

  1. Jennifer Arnett and Demand Media. (2014). What Is Inversion Exercise? http://woman.thenest.com/inversion-exercise-10616.html
  2. Gillian Mandich and Angela Peters (2013). Six detoxifying health benefits of inversions. http://www.chatelaine.com/health/wellness/the-health-benefits-of-inversions/
  3. (2015). These Are Just Some Of The Many Benefits Of Inversion Therapy. http://www.energycenter.com/grav_f/benefits.html#dep

Don’t Worry Be Happy – 9 Tools To Help You Kick Your Anxiety to the Curb!

Untitled design (25)

9 Ways To Keep Anxiety From

Dominating Your Life

Anxiety comes in many forms. Some people get nervous about social events or large crowds of people. Others get overly excited. Some people with anxiety suffer from constant worrying and negative or pessimistic thinking. A lot of people with anxiety feel like their brain is stuck on repeat – the same thought replayed in their head over and over, again and again.  You may say something to these people once but in their mind, you’ve said it more than a hundred times!
I have suffered with anxiety most of my life. I remember suffering with it as a teenager and all throughout my young adulthood. In a way, I am glad that I have gone through this struggle because it helps me relate to my neurofeedback patients. Anxiety is one of those things, kind of like sinus problems, if you do not have it you don’t really understand what it is like to suffer with it. Having this first-hand experience allows me to put myself in my patient shoes and help them through their progression. Aside from encouraging others’ happiness, I work hard at encouraging myself. One of the best exercises I have ever done through the years was creating and updating my “Makes Me Happy List.”  [Click to Tweet] This may sound a little childish but it works! One day I sat down and wrote out a long list of things, people, events, activities, etc. that make me feel happy. Some of the items on my list are simple like eating sushi, painting, listening to music, or having a girl’s night. Some of them are a little harder to do like playing in the snow, especially if it’s not winter. However, since I have over 100 items to choose from I can always find one or two things that I can do right away. I recommend doing this activity when you are in a positive mood and to write down as many things that you can.  You can also add new stuff as time goes by. To all of you reading this blog who suffer from anxiety, or those who love someone who suffers with it, remember it is controllable.   We can control our own lives. I also would like to give you a virtual hug and urge you to keep making positive steps in the right direction.
One of the biggest misconceptions is that everyone with anxiety suffers from anxiety attacks. That is false.  Not all people with anxiety actually suffer from anxiety or “panic” attacks. Panic attacks are a sudden episode of intense fear that triggers severe physical reactions when there is no real danger or apparent cause.  When a panic attack occurs, you might think you’re losing control, having a heart attack or even dying.[1]  It is important to understand the difference between the two. Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) affects 6.8 million adults or 3.1% of the U.S. population while Panic Disorder affects 6 million, or 2.7% of the U.S. population. Unfortunately women are twice as often affected by anxiety or panic disorders as men.[2]
Since this topic is relevant to my life, I wanted to take some time to tell you a few of my tricks and tips I have learned over the years to help control or reduce my anxious moments.

9 Ways To Reduce Anxiety.

1) Sleep. Get a good night sleep! Sleep is so important for our health. On average, you should get a solid seven to nine hours of sleep. Lack of sleep throws your body off rhythm and contributes to overall anxiety and stress.
2) Breath. “Deep breathing counters the effects of stress by slowing the heart rate and lowering blood pressure,” says psychologist Judith Tutin, PhD.[3]  Deep diaphragmatic breathing is a powerful anxiety-reducing technique because it activates the body’s relaxation response. It helps the body go from the fight-or-flight response of the sympathetic nervous system to the relaxed response of the parasympathetic nervous system.[4]  She suggested this practice: “Try slowly inhaling to a count of 4, filling your belly first and then your chest, gently holding your breath to a count of 4, and slowly exhaling to a count of 4 and repeat several times.” If you are having an anxiety attack the best way to control your breathing is to use a paper bag (never plastic!) to slow down and regulate your breathing pattern.
Please read the great blog Dr. David Starkey D.C. wrote titled “The Top 10 Reasons to Breathe Yourself to Better Health” for more information on how breathing can help your body.[5]
3) Laugh. We are all familiar with the old saying that laughter is the best medicine. This has been scientifically proven. According to the Mayo Clinic, laughter has a lot of positive short-term and long-term effects. Some of the short-term effects are that it increases oxygen that stimulates your organs and increases the endorphins released to your brain. It also raises your heart rate and blood pressure while reducing your body’s stress response. Laughter also helps relax muscles by stimulating blood circulation. Some of the long-term effects include helping your immune system. It does this by reducing the negative chemicals that your body releases from stress and increasing neuropeptides that help fight serious illnesses. Laughter can also act as a natural painkiller. Overall, allowing yourself to laugh is going to reduce stress and anxiety.[6]
Untitled design (26) 4) Find a positive outlet. For me one of the best ways to deal with anxiety is to either exercise or listen to some music. All forms of exercise, including yoga and walking, can ease depression and anxiety by helping the brain release feel-good chemicals and by giving your body a chance to practice dealing with stress. Please read these great blogs about yoga or about walking.   Also, research shows that listening to soothing music can lower blood pressure, heart rate, and anxiety. This could include classical music, nature sounds, beach sounds, or rain simulators.
5) Meditate or use guided imagery. A few minutes of practice per day can help ease anxiety. “Research suggests that daily meditation may alter the brain’s neural pathways, making you more resilient to stress,” says psychologist Robbie Maller Hartman, PhD, a Chicago health and wellness coach. 2. Please read “Meditation Can Actually Create More Time in Your Day”.  If meditating isn’t appealing to you, guided imagery is also effective. You can download or buy hundreds of different guided imagery tracks. They will walk you through relaxing your entire body one part at a time while focusing your mind of pleasant visualizations. Guided imagery can last from 10- 60 minutes.
6) Talk to someone. One of the easiest ways to stop the repeat button or broken track in your head is to say what you are thinking about out loud.  [Click to Tweet] Find someone who you trust and use them as a sounding board. Let it out! Even if the thought seems way too far-fetched or ridiculous once you say it out loud it will help you process that thought. This also gives you the opportunity to decide whether your thoughts are rational or irrational. Let go of the irrational thought! Focus on the positive or rational thoughts.
7) Journal. If you do not have someone or are not yet comfortable talking to someone when you are anxious, then start a journal. Journals are a safe place to pour out your thought, feeling, and emotions. I always recommend keeping the notes in your journal positive since we are trying to ease your anxiety. Or, at the very least, wrap up your entry with a positive note.
8) Focus on now. Always remember to take things one day at a time. Yes, life does happen all at once but if you sit down and prioritize your day, week, month, and year it will help relieve the stress and anxiety of taking care of everything all at once. Focus most of your energy on the events or tasks that matter the most,  [Click to Tweet] like taking care of your family, your career, finishing school, volunteering, traveling, or maybe a hobby. Whatever matters the most to you should take the highest priority and therefore receive the most focus and energy from you. This is not possible if you are constantly focusing on worrying and stress.
9) Keep Busy. One of the best ways to reduce anxiety is to distract you or keep yourself busy. As I mentioned earlier, I have a “Makes me happy list” and I recommend this for anyone with anxiety. When anxiety or depression consumes you, it is hard to remember what exactly makes you happy. This list acts like a cheat sheet – just pick out a few things off your list to distract yourself. If you are at work and you feel anxious take on more tasks or projects, or help a co-worker. When you help someone else out or do something that makes someone else happy, it is a natural response to feel satisfied and happy yourself.  Smiles are contagious!  [Click to Tweet]
Anxiety is embarrassing, annoying, and inconvenient, but it doesn’t have to consume your life. Every day is a new chance to live a better, more positive life. I hope some of these tips prove helpful, please share any positive experiences you have or have had!
What are some things you practice to control or reduce your anxiety?
Missty Klinger
June 28, 2015
www.balancingyourchemistry.com
To schedule a free neurofeedback consultation, click here.
Functional Endocrinology of Ohio
Akron: 2800 S. Arlington Road, Akron, Ohio 44312 (330) 644-5488
Cleveland: 6200 Rockside Woods Blvd., Ste. 100, Independence, Ohio 44131 (216) 236-0060
Dr. Keith S. Ungar, Dr. David Starkey and Dr. Andrew Kender, Chiropractic Physicians

[1] . Mayo Clinic. (2015). Stress relief from laughter? It’s no joke. Retrieved from http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/stress-management/in-depth/stress-relief/art-20044456
[2] Adaa. (2015). Facts & Statistics. Retrieved from http://www.adaa.org/about-adaa/press-room/facts-statistics
[3] Moninger, J. (2015). 10 Relaxation Techniques That Zap Stress Fast. Retrieved from http://www.webmd.com/balance/guide/blissing-out-10-relaxation-techniques-reduce-stress-spot
[4] Tartakovsky, M. (2013). 9 Ways to Reduce Anxiety Right Here, Right Now. Retrieved from http://psychcentral.com/lib/9-ways-to-reduce-anxiety-right-here-right-now/
[5] 3. Starkey, D. (2015). The Top 10 Reasons to Breathe Yourself to Better Health. Retrieved from https://realwellnessdoc.com/2015/05/06/stop-breathing-and-start-singing/
[6] Mayo Clinic at fn. 1

Quick Guide to Neurofeedback

NF Quick GuideQuick Guide to Neurofeedback

Hello everyone, I am one of FEO’s Neurofeedback Technicians. I love this job because I get to help clients achieve their goals and diminish symptoms with which they have suffered for years. Some of these symptoms may include sleep issues, social hinders, migraines, depression, anxiety, ADD/ADHD, and memory loss. I feel so lucky because I get to see people come in longing for help and watch them leave a happier, more collected person!

Neurofeedback is pretty high-tech stuff, but I will try to give as simple of an explanation as I can. Neurofeedback is the study of analyzing the speed of neural cells and how fast they are firing from one cell to the next.  Basically, we are looking at the electrical activity of the brain. We can identify neuronal abnormalities such as anxiety, depression, ADD, and ADHD, and then correct them with neurofeedback. How do we do this, you may ask? We record a brain map called an E.E.G. and then create a customized training protocol to help that specific client.

Brain Maps

A brain map is a report that is generated from collecting data from the brain.  We collect the data by putting an electro-cap (looks and feels like a swimmers cap) on the clients head.  19 small round sensors cover the cap. Each of these sensors reads the brain activity of a particular part of the brain and our computers record this information.   From there, the lab prepares a report based on the data collected and generates a report for our doctors.   The report includes colorful pictures of the brain that correlate to what is going on in the brain.  It shows what areas are firing too quickly or too slow, or areas where the brain waves are too high or too low. After analyzing the report, our doctors meet with each client individually to discuss the findings and create a protocol for them.

Brain Training Sessions

After the doctor creates a protocol, I take over and set the client up for their brain training session. A session comes in many different forms. The main purpose of the neurofeedback session is to exercise the brain and make it more flexible. We can achieve this goal through a variety of different means:

  • watching a movie
  • relaxing with your eye closed
  • listening to music
  • playing virtual arcade games.

During these trainings, the client receives sound or visual rewards. The rewards encourage the brain to maintain the desired level.  (The level correlates to the brain map findings.) After being rewarded, your brain will learn how to gain more rewards and eventually your brain will embrace and want the new levels. That’s why neurofeedback is successful over 90% of the time!

Neurofeedback can help with many conditions, including:

  • sleep disorders
  • chronic fatigue
  • memory loss
  • ADD/ADHD
  • migraines
  • obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD)
  • fibromyalgia
  • post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)
  • anxiety
  • depression
  • traumatic brain injuries
  • concussions

To learn more, visit our main website at www.balancingyourchemistry.com or our neurofeedback-specific website at www.brainbalancingandneurofeedbackcenter.com.

I will be back next month to go more in depth about neurofeedback, stay tuned!

Author: Klinger, Missty. February 19, 2015

Just the DNA PleaseFunctional Endocrinology of Ohio
Akron: 2800 S. Arlington Road,Suite 100, Akron, Ohio 44312 (330)644-5488
Independence: 6200 Rockside Woods Blvd.,Suite 100, Independence, Ohio 44131 (216)236-0060
Dr. Keith S. Ungar, Dr. David Starkey, Dr. Andrew Kender, Chiropractic Physicians