The Holiday Blues Are a Real Thing. 8 Ideas to Get Over Them!

Yes, the holiday blues are a real thing. It’s something that I really didn’t understand until someone close to me got them. I really couldn’t understand it. I love this time of year – all the decorations and lights and music.  All of it puts a great big smile on my face. But I felt I needed to be more understanding of what they were going through so I decided to do some research. Here’s what I found out.

The holidays are supposed to be the happiest time of the year, yet for many, they trigger deep feelings of sadness and anxiety. There’s so much emphasis on family and celebration, but it’s hard if you’re dealing with difficult memories or reminders that you’re not close to your family. Add cold weather and lack of sunlight and those are conditions to put some into a funk.

The good news: Seasonal doldrums tend to fade once the festivities are over (and if they don’t, consider seeking professional help). In the meantime, here are some tips to help you improve your mood over the next few weeks:

  1. Seek social support

Hibernation and isolation can feed a depressed mood. Surround yourself with friends, even if you don’t feel like it. Not only are you distracting yourself from your possibly blue thoughts, but being out with others provides you with opportunities for pleasure and joy.

  1. Get to the gym

Resist any excuse not to go, Or make a bargain with yourself that you only have to exercise for 10 minutes. Your heart rate will start to rise, and most likely you’ll stick it out longer because you’re already there.

  1. Don’t look at social media (Facebook, Instagram etc.)

Even though you know that most people only post their happiest moments on social media, it’s easy to lose perspective and get a serious case of FOMO (fear of missing out).

4. Help Others

Help others not because you should, but because it is the best antidote to self-pity and seasonal sadness. Find someone who is struggling more than you are, lend them a helping hand, and remember the real meaning of the holidays.

5. Stop by a place of worship

Drop into a Christian church or Muslim mosque or Jewish synagogue or Hindu template or…you get the idea. Sometimes just sitting in sacred space can remind you of the true meaning of the holidays. Most places of worship welcome all people, even those just looking for a touch of grace in the midst of a stressful day. Instead of hurrying by that church you have passed a hundred times on the way to work, take a moment to enter its doors and sit quietly, imbibing the atmosphere and the prayers of its members.

6. Forgive

Forgiveness is the slave that heals a broken spirit. Forgive all sorts of people this holiday season—those from your past, your work, your family and the ones in the news whom you love to hate. Read the stories of people (like Martin Luther King Jr. or Pumla Gobodo-Madikizela, of South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Committee) who have used forgiveness to move mountains. If they can do it, so can we.

7.  Love

Everything. Love it all. Even the hard times; even the cranky and crooked people of the world; even yourself, with all of your appalling shortcomings.

 

 

8. Do something creative and flow-inducing that’s holiday-related.

  • If you enjoy writing, brainstorm a list of words that remind you of the holidays and write a short story using as many of those words as you can. Some words you can use are the following: snow; tinsel; presents; bells; angels; Santa Claus; family; ornaments; turkey; tree; cinnamon; carols; red and green; manger; winter; glitter; star; reindeer.
  • Also for writers, write an acrostic poem using the word “Christmas”, or another holiday-related word. (An acrostic is a poem in which the first letters of each line spell out a word or phrase.)
  • If you enjoy music, compose a holiday song, make a video of you singing it, and put it up on YouTube.
  • If you enjoy drawing, make your own holiday cards.
  • If you enjoy cooking or baking, bake lots of Christmas cookies and share them with whoever looks like they need a cookie. Or, try a new recipe to make on Christmas Eve.

After doing my research I know I just need to be there and now I can make suggestions. Or partake in some of these activities and ask them to join me. I think the best solution for the holiday blues is to do something special for someone else.

Nancy Boardman
December 6, 2017

Functional Endocrinology of Ohio
Akron: 2800 S. Arlington Road, Akron, Ohio 44312 (330) 644-5488
Cleveland: 6200 Rockside Woods Blvd., Ste. 100, Independence, Ohio 44131 (216) 236-0060
Dr. Keith S. Ungar, Dr. David Hardy, Dr. Joseph Little, Chiropractic Physicians

To schedule an appointment, click here.

Websites referenced: http://www.oprah.com/spirit/10-ways-to-beat-the-holiday-blues
https://daringtolivefully.com/beat-the-holiday-blues

Are you a Podcast Person? The Who, What, When, Why and How on Podcasts

You Too Can Be Podcast Person!

The Who, The Why and The When

If you have a smartphone or a computer then it’s very easy to join the podcast world. Podcasts appeal to me because I can tailor them to my interests with minimal effort and cost. With commuting between offices, 2 days a week I’m in the care for at least 90 minutes each day. As much as I enjoy music I decided to use that time more wisely. So I make phone calls, listen to audio books and lately I’ve really gotten into all different podcasts. On the days with the shorter commute, I’m listening to my music.

I don’t think I even knew what a podcast was in 2016.  I subscribe to many and really enjoy the wide variety of topics to pick from. I also listen to a podcast as I’m falling asleep 90% of the time I fall asleep within 15 minutes. Before I started my mind would go all over the place and take me longer. I listen to a podcast that I know is going to make me happy and something that I know will set my dreams in motion. Last night, I listened to Feherty and he was interviewing Justin Thomas. Which put my golfing dreams in motion, I got my first hole in one. I set the sleep timer to 30 minutes which means I usually need to go back and listen to what I missed the next night. The podcasts that I know I’m going to need to pay close attention or that I know will keep me awake I listen to in the car. Here’s how I got started, someone told me about a podcast called Road Trippin “, It’s a couple of players that started it from the Cleveland Cavs, I learned so much more about the team and all the players and they are very funny and always kept me laughing. After that, I was hooked and started to do some research. Here are my top podcasts that I enjoy.

The What

Good Life Project

 In his weekly podcast, author and entrepreneur Jonathan Fields picks big topics like meaning, happiness, purpose, creativity, confidence, and success. Fields’ curiosity means he gives his guests (who range from Brené Brown and Seth Godin to everyday people) space and time to dive deep.

The Slow Home Podcast

 So many of us are too busy, too stressed and too tired. Brooke McAlary’s podcast is the perfect antidote. She explores what can help us live a slower and simpler life, such as developing rituals for gratitude and single-tasking, meditation, screen-free bedrooms and frugal hedonism (yes, it’s a thing).

Straight and Curly

 It might sound a bit Oprah-esque, but if you’re looking to improve yourself and live your best life, then Carly Jacobs and Kelly Exeter’s podcast is for you. Jacobs and Exeter are self-improvement junkies who discuss the side effects of living a hectic life and offer tips, advice, and strategies to get your calm on. They present a personable, funny podcast with heaps of life hacks – a fresh one each week – from learning to say no to being more decisive.

Optimal Living Daily

While it has a plain title, Justin Malik’s daily podcast is anything but ordinary. A digest of what he calls the internet’s best content, Malik narrates blog posts (with permission from their authors) which mainly look at personal development, minimalism, and productivity. It could be a recipe for dullness, but Malik has skills.  He curates compelling and challenging episodes. With each coming in at around 10 minutes, OLD is a bite-sized summary of what’s now great on the web.

Crime waves: six gripping stories By Tim Walker

The true crime story it tells is both more concise and more conclusive than its podcast predecessor.

The Daily

Twenty minutes a day, Monday to Friday of every week, dropping shortly before 6 a.m., The New York Times‘s Michael Barbaro covers the essentials of “what you need to know today”. It’s a reassuringly consistent way to feel like you’re at least keeping moderately on top of things, and the show offers an inside track on scoops like Emily Steele’s Bill O’Reilly exposé, or Maggie Haberman and Glenn Thrush’s consistently revelatory White House reporting.

The How

  • Ask your friends what they’re listening to.
  • Search by topic to find the podcast that suits your interests.
  • You can subscribe to podcasts via platforms such as iTunes, Stitcher, SoundCloud, and PodBean.

Not sure how to listen to a podcast? Ask a “techy” family member or friend to help.  It’s easy!

Nancy Boardman
November 8, 2017

Functional Endocrinology of Ohio
Akron: 2800 S. Arlington Road, Akron, Ohio 44312 (330) 644-5488
Cleveland: 6200 Rockside Woods Blvd., Ste. 100, Independence, Ohio 44131 (216) 236-0060
Dr. Keith S. Ungar, Dr. David Hardy, Dr. Joseph Little, Chiropractic Physicians
http://www.balancingyourchemistry.com

To schedule an appointment, click here.

Halloween – The Origin of All The Traditions

THE HISTORY OF HALLOWEEN1

Halloween’s origins date back to the ancient Celtic festival of Samhain (pronounced sow-in). The Celts, who lived 2,000 years ago in the area that is now Ireland, the United Kingdom, and northern France, celebrated their new year on November 1.

This day marked the end of summer and the harvest and the beginning of the dark, cold winter, a time of year that was often associated with human death. Celts believed that on the night before the new year, the boundary between the worlds of the living and the dead became blurred. On the night of October 31, they celebrated Samhain, the night that the ghosts of the dead returned to earth.

In addition to causing trouble and damaging crops, Celts thought that the otherworldly spirits made it easier for the Druids or Celtic priests, to make predictions about the future. For a people entirely dependent on the volatile natural world, these prophecies were an important source of comfort and direction during the long, dark winter.

To commemorate the event, Druids built huge sacred bonfires, where the people gathered to burn crops and animals as sacrifices to the Celtic deities. During the celebration, the Celts wore costumes, typically consisting of animal heads and skins, and attempted to tell each other’s fortunes.

When the celebration was over, they re-lit their hearth fires, which they had extinguished earlier that evening, from the sacred bonfire to help protect them during the coming winter.

By 43 A.D., the Roman Empire had conquered most of the Celtic territory. In the course of the four hundred years that they ruled the Celtic lands, two festivals of Roman origin and the traditional Celtic celebration of Samhain combined.

The first was Feralia, a day in late October when the Romans traditionally commemorated the passing of the dead. The second was a day to honor Pomona, the Roman goddess of fruit and trees. The symbol of Pomona is the apple and its incorporation into Samhain probably explains why we “bob” for apples today on Halloween.

On May 13, 609 A.D., Pope Boniface IV dedicated the Pantheon in Rome in honor of all Christian martyrs, and the Western Church established the Catholic feast of All Martyrs Day. Pope Gregory III later expanded the festival to include all saints as well as all martyrs and moved the date from May 13 to November 1.

By the 9th century, Christian influence had spread into Celtic lands, where it gradually blended with and supplanted the older Celtic rites. In 1000 A.D., the church would make November 2 All Souls’ Day, a day to honor the dead. It’s widely believed today that the church was attempting to replace the Celtic festival of the dead with a related church-sanctioned holiday.

All Souls Day and Samhain were celebrated with big bonfires, parades, and dressing up in costumes as saints, angels, and devils. The All Saints Day celebration was also called All-hallows or All-hallowmas (from Middle English Alholowmesse meaning All Saints’ Day) and the night before it, the traditional night of Samhain in the Celtic religion, was called All-Hallows Eve and, eventually, Halloween.

Halloween celebration was extremely limited in colonial New England because of the rigid Protestant belief systems there. Halloween was much more common in Maryland and the southern colonies.

As the beliefs and customs of different European ethnic groups, as well as the American Indians, meshed, a distinctly American version of Halloween began to emerge. The first celebrations included “play parties,” public events held to celebrate the harvest, where neighbors would share stories of the dead, tell each other’s fortunes, dance and sing.

Colonial Halloween festivities also featured the telling of ghost stories and mischief-making of all kinds. By the middle of the nineteenth century, annual autumn festivities were common, but Halloween was not yet celebrated everywhere in the country.

In the second half of the nineteenth century, immigrants flooded America. These new immigrants, especially the millions of Irish fleeing the Irish Potato Famine, helped to popularize Halloween celebrations nationally.

Borrowing from Irish and English traditions, Americans began to dress up in costumes and go house to house asking for food or money, a practice that eventually became today’s “trick-or-treat” tradition. Young women believed that on Halloween they could divine the name or appearance of their future husband by doing tricks with yarn, apple parings or mirrors.

In the late 1800s, there was a move in America to mold Halloween into a holiday more about community and neighborly get-togethers than about ghosts, pranks, and witchcraft. At the turn of the century, Halloween parties for both children and adults became the most common way to celebrate the day. Parties focused on games, foods of the season and festive costumes.

Newspapers and community leaders encouraged parents to take anything “frightening” or “grotesque” out of Halloween celebrations. Because of these efforts, Halloween lost most of its superstitious and religious overtones by the beginning of the twentieth century.

By the 1920s and 1930s, Halloween had become a secular, but a community-centered holiday, with parades and town-wide Halloween parties as the featured entertainment. Despite the best efforts of many schools and communities, vandalism began to plague some celebrations in many communities during this time.

By the 1950s, town leaders had successfully limited vandalism and Halloween had evolved into a holiday directed mainly at the young. Due to the high numbers of young children during the fifties baby boom, parties moved from town civic centers into the classroom or home, where they could be more easily accommodated.

Between 1920 and 1950, the centuries-old practice of trick-or-treating was also revived. Trick-or-treating was a relatively inexpensive way for an entire community to share the Halloween celebration. In theory, families could also prevent tricks being played on them by providing the neighborhood children with small treats.

Thus, a new American tradition was born, and it has continued to grow. Today, Americans spend an estimated $6 billion annually on Halloween, making it the country’s second largest commercial holiday after Christmas.

The American Halloween tradition of “trick-or-treating” probably dates back to the early All Souls’ Day parades in England. During the festivities, poor citizens would beg for food and families would give them pastries called “soul cakes” in return for their promise to pray for the family’s dead relatives.

People delivered soul cakes, encourage by their churches to replace the ancient practice of leaving food and wine for roaming spirits. The practice, known as  “going a-souling” was eventually taken up by children who would visit the houses in their neighborhood and be given ale, food, and money.

Dressing in costume for Halloween has both European and Celtic roots. Hundreds of years ago, winter was an uncertain and frightening time. Food supplies often ran low and, for the many people afraid of the dark, the short days of winter were full of constant worry.

It was believed that on Halloween, ghosts came back to the earthly world, people thought that they would meet ghosts if they left their homes. To avoid being recognized by these ghosts, people would wear masks when they left their homes after dark so that the ghosts would mistake them for fellow spirits.

On Halloween, to keep ghosts away from their houses, people would place bowls of food outside their homes to appease the ghosts and prevent them from attempting to enter.

Halloween has always been a holiday filled with mystery, magic, and superstition. It began as a Celtic end-of-summer festival during which people felt especially close to deceased relatives and friends. For these friendly spirits, they set places at the dinner table, left treats on doorsteps and along the side of the road and lit candles to help loved ones find their way back to the spirit world.

Today’s Halloween ghosts are often depicted as more fearsome and malevolent, and our customs and superstitions are scarier too. We avoid crossing paths with black cats, afraid that they might bring us bad luck. This idea has its roots in the Middle Ages when many people believed that witches avoided detection by turning themselves into black cats.

We try not to walk under ladders for the same reason. This superstition may have come from the ancient Egyptians, who believed in sacred triangles (it also may have something to do with the fact that walking under a leaning ladder is fairly unsafe). And around Halloween, especially, we try to avoid breaking mirrors, stepping on cracks in the road or spilling salt.

But what about the Halloween traditions and beliefs that today’s trick-or-treaters have forgotten all about? Many of these obsolete rituals focused on the future instead of the past and the living instead of the dead.

In particular, many had to do with helping young women find their future husbands and reassuring them that they would someday—with luck, by next Halloween—be married. In 18th-century Ireland, a matchmaking cook might bury a ring in her mashed potatoes on Halloween night, hoping to bring true love to the diner who found it.

In Scotland, fortune-tellers recommended that an eligible young woman name a hazelnut for each of her suitors and then toss the nuts into the fireplace. The nut that burned to ashes instead of  popping or exploding, the story went, represented the girl’s future husband. (In some versions of this legend, the opposite was true: The nut that burned away symbolized a love that would not last.)

Another tale had it that if a young woman ate a sugary concoction made out of walnuts, hazelnuts, and nutmeg before bed on Halloween night she would dream about her future husband.

Young women tossed apple-peels over their shoulders, hoping that the peels would fall on the floor in the shape of their future husbands’ initials; tried to learn about their futures by peering at egg yolks floating in a bowl of water; and stood in front of mirrors in darkened rooms, holding candles and looking over their shoulders for their husbands’ faces.

Other rituals were more competitive. At some Halloween parties, the first guest to find a burr on a chestnut-hunt would be the first to marry; at others, the first successful apple-bobber would be the first down the aisle.

Of course, whether we’re asking for romantic advice or trying to avoid seven years of bad luck, each one of these Halloween superstitions relies on the goodwill of the very same “spirits” whose presence the early Celts felt so keenly.

Barb Schrader
October 25, 2017

Functional Endocrinology of Ohio
Akron: 2800 S. Arlington Road, Akron, Ohio 44312 (330) 644-5488
Cleveland: 6200 Rockside Woods Blvd., Ste. 100, Independence, Ohio 44131 (216) 236-0060
Dr. Keith S. Ungar, Dr. David Hardy, Dr. Joseph Little, Chiropractic
Physicians

To schedule an appointment, click here.

http://www.history.com/topics/halloween/history-of-halloween

How Much Sleep Do You REALLY Need?

How Many ZZZZZs Do You Need To Be Healthy?

Ahhhh, nothing better than a good night of sleep. I am one of those people who knows I need a least 8 hours. I’ve been that way since I was a child. My parents have always said I never needed a bedtime because I would just go to bed when I was tired.

But do you really need 8 hours like they say? I went out and did some research to find out….

Here’s what I found out: [1]

Sleep is an important function for many reasons. When you sleep, your brain signals your body to release hormones and compounds that help:

  • decrease risk for health conditions
  • manage your hunger levels
  • maintain your immune system
  • retain memory

Researchers in the United Kingdom and Italy analyzed data from 16 separate studies conducted over 25 years, covering more than 1.3 million people and more than 100,000 deaths. They published their findings in the journal Sleep. Those who generally slept for less than six hours a night were 12 percent more likely to experience a premature death. People who slept more than eight to nine hours per night had an even higher risk, at 30 percent.

Researchers also found that people who reduced their sleep time from seven hours to five hours or less had 1.7 times the risk of death from all causes.

People who are sleep-deprived:

  • have a harder time receiving information due to the brain’s overworked neurons
  • may interpret events differently
  • tend to have impaired judgment
  • lose their ability to access previous information

It’s important to get seven to eight hours of sleep so that you can experience all the sleep stages. No one stage is responsible for memory and learning. Two stages (rapid eye movement and slow wave sleep) contribute to:

  • creative thinking
  • procedural memory
  • long-term memories
  • memory processing

I know it’s hard to make sleep one of your top priorities. We all have such busy lives and we let our phones and TV’s keep us up, which then makes it tougher for us to fall asleep.

We need to keep sleep our top priority [2]:

“Sleep helps heal and repair our heart and blood vessels, and thus sleep deficiency can lead to an increased risk of heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, and stroke. Over time, lack of sleep can lead to obesity. During our sleep, the body helps maintain and balance our hormones. If we don’t get enough sleep hormones like ghrelin (signals hunger) and leptin (signals satiety) become imbalanced. Ghrelin increases and leptin decreases. In addition, sleep also affects how our bodies react to insulin, the hormone that controls our blood glucose (sugar). Lack of sleep is linked to high blood sugar. Our sensitivity to insulin greatly decreases with inadequate sleep. In addition, sleep aids healthy growth and development. Human growth hormone is excreted during sleep, and research suggests that it’s during REM (Rapid Eye Movement) sleep that the body is able to: restore organs, bones, and tissue; replenish immune cells, and circulate human growth hormone for strong muscles and bones.”

TIPS FOR GETTING ADEQUATE SLEEP

  1. Download filters for your phone and/or laptop (check out lux) to reduce blue light and power electronics down 1 hour before bed
  2. Try a meditation app (check out Calm, Headspace, or the Mindfulness App)
  3. Use Low Blue Lights glasses, lighting, and filters in your home
  4. Stick to a sleep schedule – try to sleep and wake at consistent times
  5. Reduce or eliminate caffeine, nicotine, and alcohol before sleep
  6. Include physical activity in your daily routine (limit within 2 hours of bedtime)
  7. Increase bright light exposure during the day – natural sunlight during the day helps keep our circadian rhythm healthy
  8. Decrease the temperature of your bedroom slightly
  9. Relax and clear your mind in the evening – try reading, journaling, stretching, or prayer

Personally, I’ve started to listen to an audiobook or podcast. Something easy and relaxing will whisk me off to sleep quickly. I’m usually asleep within 15 minutes of when I lay my head down on my pillow.

Nancy Boardman
October 4, 2017

Functional Endocrinology of Ohio
Akron: 2800 S. Arlington Road, Akron, Ohio 44312 (330) 644-5488
Cleveland: 6200 Rockside Woods Blvd., Ste. 100, Independence, Ohio 44131 (216) 236-0060
Dr. Keith S. Ungar, Dr. David Hardy, Dr. Joseph Little, Chiropractic Physicians

To schedule an appointment, click here.

[1] http://www.healthline.com/health/science-sleep-why-you-need-7-8-hours-night#overview1
[2] https://www.hitenutrition.com/blog/2017/7/10/why-you-should-make-sleep-a-top-priority

 

20 Ideas For The Best Fall Ever!

20 Ideas For The Best Fall Ever by Real Wellness Doc

Fall Family Fun

Everyone knows that I am a summer lover.  I love the sunshine and the heat.  I love beaches and swimming and wearing flip-flops.  But, autumn is in the air.  The leaves are changing colors, the days are getting shorter and the air is getting cooler.  Snow will be here before we know it.

When the weather gets colder, we find ourselves in the house much more.  We sit and watch TV.  We snuggle on the couch.  We don’t go outside and exercise.  We get a little lazy and a little depressed.  But I have decided that I am not going to let that happen this Fall.  I am going to enjoy the change of seasons.  So, I came up with some fun activities I am going to do.  Here are some of my ideas:

Continue reading 20 Ideas For The Best Fall Ever!

3 One-Tank Trips That Will Help You Unplug and Unwind for a Happier, Healthier You!

Sometimes you just need to go off the grid and get your soul right – livelifehappy.com

Sometimes we just need to Unplug, Unwind and Recharge. Sometimes we just need a break from the fast-paced world.  Sometimes, we need to go offline, clear our mind and rejuvenate the senses. It’s important to unplug at various times to make time to appreciate real things. Real life is so much more beautiful. We need less mindless consumption and more mindful choices. I continue to strive for balance in my life. It’s not something that happens; I have to remind myself to stop, unplug and LIVE.  My Mantra this year, has been to get out and actively participate in my own life!  I want to take advantage of my free time and fill it with intention – intentions of living a healthier, happier, more balanced life.

Needing to recharge has inspired me to take my one tank road trips to destinations that will be good for the soul!   Below are 3 of my future destinations, 3 local B & B’s.  I can’t wait to start clearing my mind, relaxing, and enjoying the ones I love!

The Villas at Gervasi Vinyard

This is my favorite destination to simply rejuvenate!  The grounds are absolutely breathtaking.  Each Villa provides a Tuscan experience perfect for a weekend of relaxation.  You can stroll the vineyard, dine in one of three Italian inspired restaurants, shop the marketplace or simply unwind with an outdoor yoga class.  I recommend adding this to your list!   1700 55th Street NE, Canton, Ohio 44721, http://www.gervasivinyard.com

Pine Lakes Lodge

 This “Log Cabin Palace” is the perfect place to get away from it all!  You can relax atop a beautiful ridge overlooking Ohio farmland or even enjoy a Swedish massage. I plan on reserving a space during the fall to enjoy the beautiful fall foliage and fireplace.  61680 Buskirk Ln, Salesville, Ohio 44378, http://www.bedandbreakfast.com/oh-salesville-pine-lakes-lodge

The Lakehouse Inn

 This beautiful Lake House sits on 2 acres overlooking Lake Erie.  It is also, located in the heart of wine country.  You can take a long walk on the beach, through the vineyards or simply catch up on your reading lakeside.  Be sure to catch a sunrise and experience their full-service spa, 5653 Lake Road, Geneva-On-The-Lake, Ohio 44041, http://www.thelakehouseinn.com

Whatever you do or wherever you go, unplug, disconnect and take in the fresh air. Enjoy the companionship or time alone. Practicing presence will increase your joy and cut your stress!

So what are you waiting for?  Make a plan.  Go get some fresh air. Unplug, unwind and rejuvenate.

Check this out for an interesting read: www.whoishostingthis.com/blog/2014/06/03/why-going-offline-makes-you-smarter-healthier-and-more-attractive/

Joy Vale
July 26, 2017

Functional Endocrinology of Ohio
Akron: 2800 S. Arlington Road, Akron, Ohio 44312 (330) 644-5488
Cleveland: 6200 Rockside Woods Blvd., Ste. 100, Independence, Ohio 44131 (216) 236-0060
Dr. Keith S. Ungar, Dr. Andrew Kender, Dr. David Hardy, Dr. Joseph Little, Chiropractic Physicians

To schedule an appointment, click here.

“How To Meditate: 6 Methods That Can Get Anyone Meditating.” Collective Evolution. N.p., 19 Dec. 2014. Web. 17 July 2017.
“The Villas at Gervasi Vineyard.” The Villas at Gervasi Vineyard in Canton, Ohio | B&B Rental. N.p., n.d. Web. 17 July 2017.
“Pine Lakes Lodge.” Pine Lakes Lodge in Salesville, Ohio | B&B Rental. N.p., n.d. Web. 17 July 2017.
“The Lakehouse Inn.” The Lakehouse Inn in Geneva On The Lake, Ohio | B&B Rental. N.p., n.d. Web. 17 July 2017.

Reading is #1 Thing that the Most Successful People in the World Do! How You Can Get These Benefits When You Really Do Not Like to Read

HOW YOU CAN MAKE READING AND THE BENEFITS IT PROVIDES PART OF YOUR LIFE

I should admit I wasn’t much of a reader growing up, I loved having someone read to me. I would beg my sister to read to me every night before I went to bed. She read all the Trixie Belden, Nancy Drew and Hardy Boys books to me. I would have to get up often to fetch her more water as I would beg her to read just one more chapter. As I grew older I would read for school but that was about it.

In my early 20’s, I started my first business and realized that I needed success required a lot more information. I had a great mentor and I noticed he was an avid reader. So, I asked him what some of his favorite books were and why he read so much. He told me knowledge is power and that with the fast pace world and technology changing things so quickly it was his only way to stay up to date on what was going on around him.  Since he was 30 years older, I thought I don’t need to read all those business and self-help books. But I did remember how much I loved being read a good book and since my sister wasn’t close by, I picked up a book.  Soon, I became an avid reader.

I love biographies & memoirs and history books. They are still my favorites although I’ve added some mystery books into the mix.  5-6 years into owning my business, I realized I needed more help.  We were steady but not growing and I had to take a hard look in the mirror and realize if I wanted us to grow I was going to have to change and lead my team. I checked back in with my mentor and asked him to recommend my first business book.  Any guesses on what it was???? How to Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie. It really changed my life and recommend that everyone read this book at least once a year! I soon asked my entire team to read the book also. I bought each of them a copy and during our weekly staff meeting, we would discuss different parts of the book.  I don’t know if they all read it but I know that some did and it made a difference in my business.

But a woman does not survive on business books alone!  I remember my Mentor telling me not to read just business/self-help books. When you do this, you run the risk of getting tired or bored and will stop reading. He said read one fun book and then one self-help or business book. This was fantastic advice and something that I practice regularly.

I’m a firm believer that if you want succes in business or in life, you must read. You also need to take what you read and put some of it into action. It’s great to have all the knowledge but if you aren’t willing to get started, it’s not going to work. For example, I recently read a book that said successful people make their beds every day.  It’s a task but you start off every morning accomplishing something, which starts your day off with a bang.

For more on the relationship between reading and success check out this article.  https://www.themuse.com/advice/20-books-that-the-worlds-most-successful-people-read-and-recommend

Here is a list of my favorite books:

The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People by Stephen R. Covey

Born to Run by Bruce Springsteen

The Secret by Rhonda Byrne

The Andy Cohen Diaries by Andy Cohen

You’re a Badass: How to Stop Doubting Yourself and Start Living An Awesome Life by Jen Sincero

Stories I Only Tell My Friends by Rob Lowe

Who Moved My Cheese? by Spencer Johnson M. D.

A Life Well Played by Arnold Palmer

What On Earth Am I Here For? Purpose Driven Life by Rick Warren

Crucial Conversations: Tools for Talking When Stakes Are High by Al Switzler, Joseph Grenny, Kerry Patterson and Ron McMillan

Leading With My Chin by Jay Leno

The Power of Positive Thinking by Norman Vincent Peale

Lincoln on Leadership by Donald Phillips

Over the last 25 years, I have read a lot of books. There have been times when I just stopped reading but when I would start to struggle I would realize I’m not reading and I need to pick up a book. It is so easy to find a book on a topic that interests you.  You can go to Amazon, type in your search and have it downloaded or at your doorstep in a couple of days. Or, just visit your local library.  I’m also an audio book fan, alternating between one “fun” book and one book that is going to help me grow.  On my nightstand, right now – Lovely Traces of Hope by Kathy Burrus. I hope this inspires you to pick up a book.

Nancy Boardman
July 12, 2017

Functional Endocrinology of Ohio
Akron: 2800 S. Arlington Road, Akron, Ohio 44312 (330) 644-5488
Cleveland: 6200 Rockside Woods Blvd., Ste. 100, Independence, Ohio 44131 (216) 236-0060
Dr. Keith S. Ungar, Dr. Andrew Kender, Dr. David Hardy, Chiropractic Physicians

To schedule an appointment, click here.

Do You Know What is In Your Expensive Coffee?

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The Most Expensive Coffee in the World is Brewed from Beans Partially Digested and Defecated by the Asian Palm Civet

untitled-design-92The world’s most expensive coffee, kopi luwak (literally, “civet coffee”) is brewed from coffee beans eaten and partially digested by the Asian palm civet, a catlike wild animal.   The beans are harvested from the droppings of the civet and washed, and can be brewed into an aromatic coffee renowned for its low bitterness and excellent flavor.

According to coffee critic Chris Rubin, “The aroma is rich and strong, and the coffee is incredibly full bodied, almost syrupy.  It’s thick with a hint of chocolate, and lingers on the tongue with a long clean aftertaste.”  A pound of kopi luwak can cost anywhere from $100 to $3,000, and a single cup may cost as much as $80.

Traditionally, the coffee was so rare because harvesters had to scour the rainforest floor looking for civet droppings that contained coffee beans.  In recent years, some people have started caging wild civets and feeding them the beans directly.

Functional Endocrinology of Ohio
Akron: 2800 S. Arlington Road, Akron, Ohio 44312 (330) 644-5488
Cleveland: 6200 Rockside Woods Blvd., Ste. 100, Independence, Ohio 44131 (216) 236-0060
Dr. Keith S. Ungar, Dr. Andrew Kender, Dr. Robert Nichols, Dr. Jessica Eckman, Chiropractic Physicians

To schedule an appointment, click here.

www.nytimes.com/2010/04/18/world/asia/18civetcoffee.html
http://www.naturalnews.com/specialreports/25-Amazing-Facts-About-Food.pdf

4 Questions to Consider if You Struggle With Anxiety, Depression or Other Brain-Related Condition”

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The Link Between Chiropractic Care and Brain Function

You may have heard of a vertebral subluxation and may even know that a good chiropractor can help with that. But, did you also know that a subluxation can impact brain function?

What is a Vertebral Subluxation you might ask?

A vertebral subluxation is a vertebra that has lost its normal position and/or motion in relation to its existing vertebrae. When this occurs the surrounding muscle, ligaments, and discs start to weaken much more readily due to compensation and overuse.

What can cause this you might ask?     Untitled design (87)

Subluxations can be caused by a physical, chemical, or emotional entity. A physical vertebral subluxation can occur due to acute trauma, disc degeneration, curvatures, spondylolisthesis, structural abnormalities, imbalanced spinal musculature, repetitive motions that affect the spine, bad posture, among other things. A chemical contributor can be in the form of poor nutritional habits, dietary changes, toxins, alcohol use, and drug abuse. The last factor is the emotional aspect, which includes stress. Stresses can deteriorate normal functions within the body creating a weakened immune system leading to greater risk of injury and disease.

How does this relate to our brain?

Heidi Haavik, Kelly Holt, Bernadette Murphy, along with others undertook a recent study published in the Journal of Neural Plasticity. The JOURNAL OF NEURAL PLASTICITY! “The research shows that when we adjust the spine, we significantly increase activity in the prefrontal cortex. “The study showed a change in brain function by almost 20% on average. The prefrontal cortex is the area of the brain where higher learning and cognition happens.” A chiropractic adjustment already helps with sensorimotor function (for the prevention of falls), improved joint position sense, improved muscle strength, better pelvic floor stability, and the ability to perform mental rotation of objects. We now know that along with all of this we can also improve our eye movements, spatial awareness, behavior, goal-oriented tasks, decision making, memory and attention, intelligence, the process behind pain, autonomic function, and motor control.  So… in turn getting regular chiropractic adjustments for spinal subluxations can help with brain function/activity.

How does this link with neurofeedback training?

This comes full circle when we combine chiropractic care with neurofeedback training. Along with the adjustment affecting the prefrontal cortex, the neurofeedback training conducted in clinic helps to fire off the different lobes and pathways in our brain as well. A good analogy in understanding neurofeedback is when comparing it to physical exercise. We challenge our body by applying various exercises and weights. Neurofeedback is similar in the sense that we are challenging our brain to learn and function better by focusing our attention on a goal-oriented task and training our brain to move away from undesirable states like anxiety and depression for example.

Dr. Kristy Narsinghani
Chiropractic Intern
August 28, 2016

Functional Endocrinology of Ohio
Akron: 2800 S. Arlington Road, Akron, Ohio 44312 (330) 644-5488
Cleveland: 6200 Rockside Woods Blvd., Ste. 100, Independence, Ohio 44131 (216) 236-0060
Dr. Keith S. Ungar, Dr. Andrew Kender, Dr. Robert Nichols, Dr. Jessica Eckman
Chiropractic Physicians

To schedule an appointment, click here.

http://circleofdocs.com/without-a-doubt-chiropractic-research-shows-adjusting-the-subluxated-spine-changes-brain-function/