5 Ways To Make a Change in Your Community

So many communities could be much closer-knit and cleaner but no one attempts to make the change. So, why don’t you kick it off and start the change! Here are a few ways to get yourself up and moving in your community.

  1.  Clean up

 Trash is left all up and down roads and grass. Try just going out with a trash bag and picking some of it up. It will make it look so much cleaner and also may motivate others to try to make a change in the community too, setting off a chain of good deeds. This could also be a good bonding time or a little “get to know you session” of someone who you don’t talk too much.

2.  Plant flowers

Now this one might seem a little pointless but trust me, it is well worth it. On my way to work every day, I pass by a patch of flowers spelling out “Coventry” and that small patch of flowers adds a whole new aesthetic to the street and makes it all look a lot better. Just some flowers in your front yard can make a whole new look to your street so give it a try.

3.  Baked Goods

No, not for yourself but for your neighbors. Get yourself out there and just make some new friends. This can be hard for some but in the long run, it will bring your whole community together. Try hosting a get-together and inviting your neighbors so they can get to know others who are a little too shy to introduce themselves.

4.  Overall attitude

This one is pretty straightforward. Being a friendly person will make everyone else feel better as well as make your community more connected. Just giving a simple “hello, how are you?” Or inviting them over for dinner, a drink or whatever you want will work. Just be friendly to them.

5.  Volunteer

When you see that poster on a telephone pole asking for volunteers to help a community pick up, do it! You don’t need to commit your whole day, just a few hours can make all the difference! Even if you don’t volunteer every time, you will still make a difference in the long run. The first step to changing the community is changing the bad habits. So next your free and bored, go out to a community event and help out and don’t sit at home watching whatever you can find on tv.

These are just a few of the ways you can make a change in your community. There are so many more that you can use to make a difference, so what are you waiting for? Go out and start your change!

Dallas Cain
August 1, 2018

Functional Endocrinology of Ohio
Akron: 2800 S. Arlington Road, Akron, Ohio 44312 (330) 644-5488
Cleveland: 6200 Rockside Woods Blvd., Ste. 100, Independence, Ohio 44131 (216) 236-0060
Dr. Keith S. Ungar, Dr. Jessica Eckman, Chiropractic Physicians

To schedule an appointment, click here.

Does Happiness Improve Your Health? 13 Tips To Make Sure It Does!

Being a happy, healthy person is much easier said than done.

Everyone wants heath and happiness.

Here’s a great article and shows some of the science that connect health and happiness. https://www.globalwellnesssummit.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/7_happiness_2018TrendsWellness.pdf

Loved this paragraph.

Mounting Evidence: Happiness Improves Physical Health Anyone that cares about human health needs to care about happiness because studies increasingly show that happiness has an independent and powerful impact on physical health. It’s been studied in-depth. For instance, a 2017 meta-review2 of 150+ studies on the connection confirm with “almost no doubt” that happiness really can influence health. Another Harvard meta-review3 of 200+ studies found a connection between happiness and optimism and lowered risk of cardiovascular disease and abnormal body weight. A 2018 study4 led by Cornell University found that people who experience a range of positive daily emotions – from enthusiasm to calm – have lower levels of inflammation, which is linked to a lower risk of premature death and chronic disease. Other studies show happiness’ positive impact on everything from speeding wound healing to longer telomeres. And, while these studies show a strong association more than cause and effect, the evidence keeps growing that happiness affects health and aging deep down to the cellular level.

We’ll see more “eating for happiness” with diets and menus packed with more foods like tuna, salmon, nuts, seeds, bananas, green tea, dark chocolate, spinach, blueberries, and blackberries because they boost serotonin and other happiness hormones. Research mounts that food has a powerful impact on the brain and mood: For instance, a 2017 study from Deakin University (AU) showed that an anti-inflammatory Mediterranean-style diet high in vegetables, fish, olive oil and nuts reduced symptoms of depression in 32% of its sample. J. Walter Thompson (JWT) also named “Mood Food” as one its top trends for 2018, and we see companies like Monarch Airlines creating mood-enhancing food menus for passengers (like green tea and lavender cakes to calm anxiety) or even Pizza Hut introducing a mood-enhancing pizza. The really eye-opening research is around how our microbiome – that ecosystem of bacteria, fungi, viruses, and yeasts that live in our intestinal tract – plays a powerful role in regulating our emotions and determining our very happiness. All those bugs in our gut generate many of the transmitters and hormones that play out within the brain, like serotonin that regulates mood, appetite, sleep and social behavior. Studies even indicate that the lion’s share of our serotonin is produced in our gut, and disruptions in the microbiome are being connected to anxiety, depression, autism, and dementia. The research about the tight connections between the gut and mental health is so compelling that the Denver VA hospital is running a trial using probiotics to treat veterans with PTSD, and their findings17 of the impact that this simple food supplement has on how our brains and bodies respond to trauma are fascinating. It’s no newsflash that more people are eating for a healthier microbiome, meaning more soluble fiber (like brown bread, nuts, and seeds) and probiotic/ fermented foods like yogurt, kombucha, kefir, sauerkraut, and kimchi. What we will see more of is research specifically on the gut-brain-happiness axis, an exciting field called psychobiotics.

Here’s another article: http://time.com/4866693/happiness-improves-health/

The review does point out that in many of these studies, it’s possible that better health could lead to improved emotional states, rather than the other way around. Since most studies on this topic are observational, it’s possible that other variables (that were not or could not be controlled for) are to blame for changes in both happiness and health.

But overall, the authors wrote, the evidence is strong enough to say that subjective well-being can influence health and longevity, “at least in some instances.” The question now, they say, is why happiness is linked to health for some people, but not for others.

Here are some tips that will overall help your happiness and your health.

Stop negative thinking

A negative mind will never give you a positive life. Stop thoughts that are limiting and self-defeating like “I can’t do that “or “I’m not good enough “. Don’t believe everything you think. Negative and pessimistic thinking is unhelpful and will hold you back from achieving your goals and greater self-confidence. Replace negative thoughts with words that are positive and motivating. At the beginning, it is difficult, but the more you repeatedly send positive messages to yourself, the better you will feel.

Stop comparing yourself to other people

It is an extremely unhealthy habit, but even the most confident people do it: Comparing. We all do it. It’s human, but constant comparison with others make you feel bad about yourself and lowers your self-esteem. You begin to question your own worth. And this can lead to frustration, depression, eating disorders, over-spending, and simply to the feeling of not being good enough. Life is not a competition. If you make it one, nobody will win. It’s always a losing battle because the only person you’re really hurting, in the end, is yourself. Stop comparing and start living!

Don’t be a victim

You create your life. You have to take responsibility! Even if situations become unbearable, there is always a way out. You will always have the choice to make a change.

Don’t be a people-pleaser

Respect yourself and others will respect you, as easy as that. Don’t spend your whole life on trying to make everyone happy. Practice building self-awareness, discover what you are willing to do and what you don’t want to do. Start putting this into practice by saying no when something doesn’t resonate or align with who you really are. People might get mad at first, but eventually, most will come to respect you.

Start loving yourself

Self-esteem is all about how much you feel you are worth — and how much you feel other people value you. Your level of self-esteem affects your happiness and everything you do.

Be yourself! 

Don’t be somebody else. Take control of your life and live it by your own rules. Find a personal style that feels great to you and be proud of it. There is no one like you and that is your power!

Care for yourself

Eat a healthy diet, exercise regularly, drink plenty of water and sleep at least 7 to 8 hours per night. If you don’t get enough sleep, everything else will suffer. Sleep deprivation (which most of us suffer from) puts you in a pre-diabetic state, messes with your metabolism, makes you more likely to be overweight, increases your appetite, decreases your productivity, hampers your immune system, and makes you tired, moody, anxious and likely to be depressed.

Don’t strive for perfection

Nobody is perfect. You will always find someone who is more beautiful, smarter, richer, better or worse. But you won´t find someone who is perfect.

Concentrate on your strengths not your weaknesses 

Focus on what you have already achieved and reached, not what you lack and miss. Be proud of yourself and know your strengths. Avoid negative people, places, and things you don’t like or that make you feel bad about yourself.

Being around toxic people can drain your energy, make you unhappy and insecure. Surround yourself with people who lift you up, give you energy and make you feel good about yourself.

Stay focused on the present moment

It is the only reality. When the past and the future feel painful, focus on the task at hand and do it with your full engagement. Enjoy your life, make the best out of it!

Be childish and play more

When it comes to certain things, children do them way better than we do. Who said you have to get serious while growing up? Never lose the child in you, the childlike faith, childlike hope, childlike play and creativity.

Forgive yourself

Feeling bad about things you’ve done in the past can create a pretty painful present. Remember that you can begin new any day. Your past does not predict your future.

Be grateful 

Gratitude is an attitude and a way of living that has many benefits in terms of health and happiness. Feeling and expressing gratitude, instead of wanting more and more, turns our mental focus to the good things in life, which will create more things for which to be grateful. As you awake each morning, give thanks for your breath and being healthy. Life is a gift, never forget that.

Watch your thoughts, they become words.

Watch your words, they become actions.

Watch your actions, they become habits.

Watch your habits, they become your character.

Watch your character, it becomes your destiny.

Author unknown

Here’s a great Podcast on Health and Happiness:  Happy Healthy and Fit Life By Hosts Janell Yule and Jennifer Grant

Here’s a great book to read.  Happiness & Health: 9 Choices That Unlock the Powerful Connection …

Have a Happy Healthy Day!

Nancy Boardman
June 14, 2018

Functional Endocrinology of Ohio
Akron: 2800 S. Arlington Road, Akron, Ohio 44312 (330) 644-5488
Cleveland: 6200 Rockside Woods Blvd., Ste. 100, Independence, Ohio 44131 (216) 236-0060
Dr. Keith S. Ungar, Dr. Jessica Eckman, Chiropractic Physicians

To schedule an appointment, click here.

3 Ways to Effectively Communicate With Your Doctor

doctor-visit

How to Talk to Your Doc

Sometimes, going to the doctor is a stressful experience.  What will he/she find?  What will he/she tell me to do?  Will I need to take medication or have a procedure?  What if he/she cannot find anything wrong?  Will the doctor listen to me and really try to figure out what is wrong?

Doctors are busy.  The traditional medical office might allow for 5 minutes with the doctor. Even if you are fortunate enough to see a doctor who spends at least 20 minutes with you on each visit like we do in our office, here are some tips to make your visit is as productive as possible.

1. Be Prepared (but not over-prepared).

If this is the first time you are seeing the doctor, you filled out paperwork either immediately before or in the weeks before your visit.  Depending on the doctor, he or she may not have reviewed that paperwork before coming into the examining room. So, be prepared to answer the question, “So, what brings you here today?” in a few short sentences.  [Click to Tweet] Prior to your visit, jot down the most important things you want the doctor to know, not every symptom you’ve ever had, or your entire health history.  If you need to, you can bring your little checklist with you.  This will serve 2 purposes:  (1) give the doctor the critical information needed to diagnose and treat you; and (2) force you to really narrow down and focus on what is really bothering you.

If you see this doctor regularly, you should also prepare for your visit by jotting down specific questions, improvements, and issues that have arisen since your last visit.  You can assume that the doctor is familiar with your history at this point so there is no need to go back over any of those items unless it specifically relates to a question or issue that has come up since your last visit.

Whether this is the first visit with the doctor or one of many visits, there is such a thing as being “over-prepared.”  Information is at our fingertips thanks to the internet.  We Google everything.  35% of people say that they have gone on-line to figure out what medical condition they (or someone else) may have.[1]  But, only 41% of people say that a medical professional has confirmed that diagnosis. [1]. [Click to Tweet] So, what this means is that you may work yourself up for absolutely no reason when you try to self-diagnose on the internet.  According to  Dr. Aditi Nerurkar, many of her patients “come in after sleepless nights spent worrying about dangerous diseases they’ve learned about through web searches. ‘While I love their sense of curiosity and ownership of their health,’ she says, ‘their online searches can (and often do) go awry.'”[2]  Go ahead and do some internet research but remember when doing it to consider the source and understand that you are not a medical professional. By all means, mention your research to your doctor (briefly) but then allow the doctor to do his or her work.

2.  Bring a Current List of Medications and Vitamins

If it has been awhile since you have seen your doctor, you must give the office a current list of all medications, vitamins and over-the-counter medication you are taking.  If you have not put together a list before you go to your appointment, you cannot accurately communicate this information to your doctor either on a form or during your office visit.  This will make it hard for your doctor to discuss a treatment plan with you during your visit.  This means you cannot ask questions about that treatment plan with the doctor sitting right in front of you.  For example, if you are visiting an oral surgeon to discuss possible dental surgery in 2 weeks, your doctor will need to know what supplements/medications you are taking right now so he or she can tell you what changes you need to make before surgery. You may have questions about those changes.

3.  Be Courteous But Firm.

We have all been to a doctor at some point who breezed in and out so fast that there was absolutely no time to ask any questions even if properly ready.  There are times when this is necessary due to a medical emergency with another patient.  Otherwise, you should ask when scheduling your appointment how long you will have with the doctor that day and politely insist that you get that time.  Plan your questions (see #1 above) so that they fit within that time-frame.  You can start your appointment by telling the doctor that his or staff told you that you had 10 minutes with the doctor and that you are considerate of his or her time and schedule and that you prepared for your visit to make sure everything is addressed within that time-frame.  Remember, too, that the doctor will have certain things that he or she has to do that will take time so it might be wise to time your questions for about 1/2 of the allotted appointment time.

You should also remember that the doctor does have other patients on his schedule.  Once you have reached the end of your allotted time, you should respect the doctor and his other patients and be ready to end the appointment quickly.  If you have other questions that have not been answered, ask the doctor if you can discuss those with his staff or give them a written list of questions that the doctor or staff can answer by phone at a later time.  If you have followed the steps outlined above though, your visit should have been productive and efficient for both you and your doctor.

We would love to hear about one of your doctor visits that were either productive or that left you feeling uncertain or confused.  Maybe we can figure out a solution.

Caroline Boardman
May 23, 2018, republished from February 11, 2016

www.balancingyourchemistry.com

Functional Endocrinology of Ohio
Akron: 2800 S. Arlington Road, Akron, Ohio 44312 (330) 644-5488
Cleveland: 6200 Rockside Woods Blvd., Ste. 100, Independence, Ohio 44131 (216) 236-0060
Dr. Keith S. Ungar and Dr. Jessica Eckman, Chiropractic Physicians

To schedule an appointment, click here.

[1] http://www.pewinternet.org/files/old-media/Files/Reports/PIP_HealthOnline.pdf
[2] http://mashable.com/2012/06/15/online-medical-searches/#2XjEdh8ikZqH

 

How Do You Know if You Have Spring Fever? 7 Clues!

The definition of Spring Fever: a feeling of restlessness and excitement felt at the beginning of spring.

Did you know there was actually a disease called Spring Disease or Spring Fever? In centuries past, an affliction struck the populace in spring, rendering them weak with joint swelling, loose teeth, and poorly healing wounds.  The name given this disease of listlessness and weakness was “Spring Disease”, or “Spring Fever”, and that name has continued into our time as the listless loss of ambition that accompanies the first few days of warm weather in the spring.  A few centuries ago, this disease of spring was more serious and was often fatal.  It was scurvy.  Scurvy is the lack of vitamin C, of course, and in the 18th century, it was a major threat to life. Here’s more information on the real disease of the past. https://pauljanson.wordpress.com/2013/04/26/when-spring-fever-was-a-real-disease/

I don’t have that disease; it hasn’t been warm enough.  As I write this today it’s still snowing outside. I pride myself on being a very optimistic person and for the most part, light-hearted and fun. But I’m so sick of the cold and the snow that it actually has started to affect my mood.  I keep telling myself it’s only a couple more weeks and it’s going to get warmer. And, in anticipation, I’m ready for the fever”  Here are 6 things that tell me I’ve got it:

  1. I can’t wait to get back outside to start back my walking routine. I don’t enjoy walking on a treadmill; I last about 4 miles and then I’m done. But if I’m outside, I can go 6-8 miles pretty easily. I’m excited to get back to training for a half marathon. Here’s a great site with a training plan if you want to get out and walk too. https://walkthewalk.org/training/training-plans/
  1. I’m getting focused on my diet and eating lighter and healthier.  I’m ready to buy fresh produce from farmers’ markets in the area and looking forward to using the grill!  My favorite spring vegetables:

Artichoke
Asparagus
Avocado
Celeriac

 

Looks are deceiving when it comes to celeriac, which despite its knobbed and gnarled appearance, is actually one attractive addition to your diet! Stock up on this vegetable in the spring months for its high levels of vitamin C, vitamin K, phosphorus, potassium, vitamin B6, magnesium, and manganese, which are important for blood health. In addition to these nutrients, celeriac is an excellent source of dietary fiber, which is important for digestive health and can help you feel satiated for longer.

Fennel
Mustard Greens
Radishes
Vidalia Onions
Watercress

3.  Have you ever noticed during the spring and summer you need less sleep? I think it’s because it stays lighter out longer and I feel like I can do more. Here’s an article that talks about sleeping more during the winter months. https://sleep.org/articles/changing-sleep-needs-2/

4.  I know I keep smiling.  I just am happier. I feel like my energy level really jumps and it takes a lot more to aggravate me. I can get through anything that hits me, and I can’t wait to get outside and feel the sun on my face. It just makes me feel like anything is possible.

5.  I also get really organized; I can’t wait to put my boots and winter clothes away and pull out my flip-flops and sandals. I like getting the house all clean and organized. I actually look forward to cleaning out the garage.  

 

 

6.  And I’m ready to get that first pedicure after the winter months of keeping my toes hidden. Of course, all the upkeep takes a little getting used to again, as I’ve neglected my feet during the cold months knowing no one is going to see them. According to Glamour magazine here are some of the nail color trends for Spring 2018:  Metallic Gold,  Dark Green,  Zig Zag pattern,  Purple,  Pastels (Matte), Magenta.

7.  It’s also time for fun warm-weather reading. I’m starting with Spring Fever by Mary Kay Andrews.  

So if you have any of these “symptoms,” don’t be surprised – you just have SPRING FEVER!

Nancy Boardman
March 28, 2018
 

Functional Endocrinology of Ohio
Akron: 2800 S. Arlington Road, Akron, Ohio 44312 (330) 644-5488
Cleveland: 6200 Rockside Woods Blvd., Ste. 100, Independence, Ohio 44131 (216) 236-0060
Dr. Keith S. Ungar, Chiropractic Physician

To schedule an appointment, click here.

7 One Tank Road Trips To Bring Joy To Your Holiday Season!

 “Joy is what happens to us when we allow ourselves to recognize how good things really are.” –Marianne Williamson

With the hustle and bustle of the holiday season upon us, I want to inspire you to make the most of your moments this season and find real Joy in the ones you love!  A Joyful heart is a good medicine!

1.   The Christmas Cave at White Gravel Mines: 4007 White Gravel McDaniel Road, Minford, Ohio 45653.  

This new Christmas attraction is first on my list! The cave features thousands of lights and biblical scenes depicting the birth of Christ on a mile long passageway throughout the mines.  This is a self-guided tour lasting about 1 hour.  There are benches along the way if you need to stop and rest.  www.towncal.com/event/the-christmas-cave/2016-12-02/

2.  A Christmas Story House Museum: 3159 11th Street, Cleveland, Ohio 44109

If you are a fan of the movie, this is a must-see in Cleveland!  The 19th century Victorian is restored and renovated to appear as it did in the 1983 film A Christmas Story.  http://www.achristmasstoryhouse.com/

3.  Ugly Sweater Holiday Train Ride: Cuyahoga Valley Scenic Railroad Rockside Station

It’s an ugly holiday sweater party!  This is an adult only, 2-hour train ride through the beautiful Cuyahoga Valley.  Invite your family and friends for holiday spirits and a competition of ugliest sweaters.  www.cvsr.com/responsive_slider/ugly-sweater-holiday-party/

 

 

4.  Festival of Lights at the Cincinnati Zoo

Now through January 1, 2018, the Cincinnati Zoo is transformed into a “Wild Wonderland” Enjoy the splendor of 3 million LED lights,   Swan Lake Lightshow and maybe even indulge in the S’mores stand.  http://cincinnatizoo.org/events/festival-of-lights/

 

 

 

5.  Ice Skate at Cleveland’s Public Square, Cincinnati’s Fountain Square.

Whether it’s your first time or it’s like riding a bike to you, Ice Skating is sure to put a smile on your face.  Make it a family night or make it a date night!  www.clevelandpublicsquare.com  or www.myfountainsquare.com

6.  The Epic Snow Tubing Hill at Mad River Mountain: 1000 Snow Valley Road, Zanesfield, Ohio 43360

Featuring 10 lanes at 1000’ long this ride is sure to bring back joyful memories of being a kid! They also offer private tubing sessions where you, your family and friends could enjoy the slopes with your own private party.  https://www.skimadriver.com/

 

7.  Cleveland Metroparks Chalet Toboggan Chutes: 16200 Valley Parkway, Strongsville, Ohio 44136

Add this to your bucket list and experience the icy thrill of tobogganing!  https://www.clevelandmetroparks.com/parks/visit/parks/mill-stream-run-reservation/the-chalet.

Whatever you choose to do,  find joy in the journey!  I Hope This Season Brings You much joy!

Merry Christmas and a blessed New Year from All of Us at Functional Endocrinology of Ohio

Joy Vale
Patient Care Coordinator
12/20/2017

Functional Endocrinology of Ohio
Akron: 2800 S. Arlington Road, Akron, Ohio 44312 (330) 644-5488
Cleveland: 6200 Rockside Woods Blvd., Ste. 100, Independence, Ohio 44131 (216) 236-0060
Dr. Keith S. Ungar and Dr. David Hardy, Chiropractic Physicians

To schedule an appointment, click here.

 

 

 

The Holiday Blues Are a Real Thing. 8 Ideas to Get Over Them!

Yes, the holiday blues are a real thing. It’s something that I really didn’t understand until someone close to me got them. I really couldn’t understand it. I love this time of year – all the decorations and lights and music.  All of it puts a great big smile on my face. But I felt I needed to be more understanding of what they were going through so I decided to do some research. Here’s what I found out.

The holidays are supposed to be the happiest time of the year, yet for many, they trigger deep feelings of sadness and anxiety. There’s so much emphasis on family and celebration, but it’s hard if you’re dealing with difficult memories or reminders that you’re not close to your family. Add cold weather and lack of sunlight and those are conditions to put some into a funk.

The good news: Seasonal doldrums tend to fade once the festivities are over (and if they don’t, consider seeking professional help). In the meantime, here are some tips to help you improve your mood over the next few weeks:

  1. Seek social support

Hibernation and isolation can feed a depressed mood. Surround yourself with friends, even if you don’t feel like it. Not only are you distracting yourself from your possibly blue thoughts, but being out with others provides you with opportunities for pleasure and joy.

  1. Get to the gym

Resist any excuse not to go, Or make a bargain with yourself that you only have to exercise for 10 minutes. Your heart rate will start to rise, and most likely you’ll stick it out longer because you’re already there.

  1. Don’t look at social media (Facebook, Instagram etc.)

Even though you know that most people only post their happiest moments on social media, it’s easy to lose perspective and get a serious case of FOMO (fear of missing out).

4. Help Others

Help others not because you should, but because it is the best antidote to self-pity and seasonal sadness. Find someone who is struggling more than you are, lend them a helping hand, and remember the real meaning of the holidays.

5. Stop by a place of worship

Drop into a Christian church or Muslim mosque or Jewish synagogue or Hindu template or…you get the idea. Sometimes just sitting in sacred space can remind you of the true meaning of the holidays. Most places of worship welcome all people, even those just looking for a touch of grace in the midst of a stressful day. Instead of hurrying by that church you have passed a hundred times on the way to work, take a moment to enter its doors and sit quietly, imbibing the atmosphere and the prayers of its members.

6. Forgive

Forgiveness is the slave that heals a broken spirit. Forgive all sorts of people this holiday season—those from your past, your work, your family and the ones in the news whom you love to hate. Read the stories of people (like Martin Luther King Jr. or Pumla Gobodo-Madikizela, of South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Committee) who have used forgiveness to move mountains. If they can do it, so can we.

7.  Love

Everything. Love it all. Even the hard times; even the cranky and crooked people of the world; even yourself, with all of your appalling shortcomings.

 

 

8. Do something creative and flow-inducing that’s holiday-related.

  • If you enjoy writing, brainstorm a list of words that remind you of the holidays and write a short story using as many of those words as you can. Some words you can use are the following: snow; tinsel; presents; bells; angels; Santa Claus; family; ornaments; turkey; tree; cinnamon; carols; red and green; manger; winter; glitter; star; reindeer.
  • Also for writers, write an acrostic poem using the word “Christmas”, or another holiday-related word. (An acrostic is a poem in which the first letters of each line spell out a word or phrase.)
  • If you enjoy music, compose a holiday song, make a video of you singing it, and put it up on YouTube.
  • If you enjoy drawing, make your own holiday cards.
  • If you enjoy cooking or baking, bake lots of Christmas cookies and share them with whoever looks like they need a cookie. Or, try a new recipe to make on Christmas Eve.

After doing my research I know I just need to be there and now I can make suggestions. Or partake in some of these activities and ask them to join me. I think the best solution for the holiday blues is to do something special for someone else.

Nancy Boardman
December 6, 2017

Functional Endocrinology of Ohio
Akron: 2800 S. Arlington Road, Akron, Ohio 44312 (330) 644-5488
Cleveland: 6200 Rockside Woods Blvd., Ste. 100, Independence, Ohio 44131 (216) 236-0060
Dr. Keith S. Ungar, Dr. David Hardy, Dr. Joseph Little, Chiropractic Physicians

To schedule an appointment, click here.

Websites referenced: http://www.oprah.com/spirit/10-ways-to-beat-the-holiday-blues
https://daringtolivefully.com/beat-the-holiday-blues

Are you a Podcast Person? The Who, What, When, Why and How on Podcasts

You Too Can Be Podcast Person!

The Who, The Why and The When

If you have a smartphone or a computer then it’s very easy to join the podcast world. Podcasts appeal to me because I can tailor them to my interests with minimal effort and cost. With commuting between offices, 2 days a week I’m in the care for at least 90 minutes each day. As much as I enjoy music I decided to use that time more wisely. So I make phone calls, listen to audio books and lately I’ve really gotten into all different podcasts. On the days with the shorter commute, I’m listening to my music.

I don’t think I even knew what a podcast was in 2016.  I subscribe to many and really enjoy the wide variety of topics to pick from. I also listen to a podcast as I’m falling asleep 90% of the time I fall asleep within 15 minutes. Before I started my mind would go all over the place and take me longer. I listen to a podcast that I know is going to make me happy and something that I know will set my dreams in motion. Last night, I listened to Feherty and he was interviewing Justin Thomas. Which put my golfing dreams in motion, I got my first hole in one. I set the sleep timer to 30 minutes which means I usually need to go back and listen to what I missed the next night. The podcasts that I know I’m going to need to pay close attention or that I know will keep me awake I listen to in the car. Here’s how I got started, someone told me about a podcast called Road Trippin “, It’s a couple of players that started it from the Cleveland Cavs, I learned so much more about the team and all the players and they are very funny and always kept me laughing. After that, I was hooked and started to do some research. Here are my top podcasts that I enjoy.

The What

Good Life Project

 In his weekly podcast, author and entrepreneur Jonathan Fields picks big topics like meaning, happiness, purpose, creativity, confidence, and success. Fields’ curiosity means he gives his guests (who range from Brené Brown and Seth Godin to everyday people) space and time to dive deep.

The Slow Home Podcast

 So many of us are too busy, too stressed and too tired. Brooke McAlary’s podcast is the perfect antidote. She explores what can help us live a slower and simpler life, such as developing rituals for gratitude and single-tasking, meditation, screen-free bedrooms and frugal hedonism (yes, it’s a thing).

Straight and Curly

 It might sound a bit Oprah-esque, but if you’re looking to improve yourself and live your best life, then Carly Jacobs and Kelly Exeter’s podcast is for you. Jacobs and Exeter are self-improvement junkies who discuss the side effects of living a hectic life and offer tips, advice, and strategies to get your calm on. They present a personable, funny podcast with heaps of life hacks – a fresh one each week – from learning to say no to being more decisive.

Optimal Living Daily

While it has a plain title, Justin Malik’s daily podcast is anything but ordinary. A digest of what he calls the internet’s best content, Malik narrates blog posts (with permission from their authors) which mainly look at personal development, minimalism, and productivity. It could be a recipe for dullness, but Malik has skills.  He curates compelling and challenging episodes. With each coming in at around 10 minutes, OLD is a bite-sized summary of what’s now great on the web.

Crime waves: six gripping stories By Tim Walker

The true crime story it tells is both more concise and more conclusive than its podcast predecessor.

The Daily

Twenty minutes a day, Monday to Friday of every week, dropping shortly before 6 a.m., The New York Times‘s Michael Barbaro covers the essentials of “what you need to know today”. It’s a reassuringly consistent way to feel like you’re at least keeping moderately on top of things, and the show offers an inside track on scoops like Emily Steele’s Bill O’Reilly exposé, or Maggie Haberman and Glenn Thrush’s consistently revelatory White House reporting.

The How

  • Ask your friends what they’re listening to.
  • Search by topic to find the podcast that suits your interests.
  • You can subscribe to podcasts via platforms such as iTunes, Stitcher, SoundCloud, and PodBean.

Not sure how to listen to a podcast? Ask a “techy” family member or friend to help.  It’s easy!

Nancy Boardman
November 8, 2017

Functional Endocrinology of Ohio
Akron: 2800 S. Arlington Road, Akron, Ohio 44312 (330) 644-5488
Cleveland: 6200 Rockside Woods Blvd., Ste. 100, Independence, Ohio 44131 (216) 236-0060
Dr. Keith S. Ungar, Dr. David Hardy, Dr. Joseph Little, Chiropractic Physicians
http://www.balancingyourchemistry.com

To schedule an appointment, click here.

Halloween – The Origin of All The Traditions

THE HISTORY OF HALLOWEEN1

Halloween’s origins date back to the ancient Celtic festival of Samhain (pronounced sow-in). The Celts, who lived 2,000 years ago in the area that is now Ireland, the United Kingdom, and northern France, celebrated their new year on November 1.

This day marked the end of summer and the harvest and the beginning of the dark, cold winter, a time of year that was often associated with human death. Celts believed that on the night before the new year, the boundary between the worlds of the living and the dead became blurred. On the night of October 31, they celebrated Samhain, the night that the ghosts of the dead returned to earth.

In addition to causing trouble and damaging crops, Celts thought that the otherworldly spirits made it easier for the Druids or Celtic priests, to make predictions about the future. For a people entirely dependent on the volatile natural world, these prophecies were an important source of comfort and direction during the long, dark winter.

To commemorate the event, Druids built huge sacred bonfires, where the people gathered to burn crops and animals as sacrifices to the Celtic deities. During the celebration, the Celts wore costumes, typically consisting of animal heads and skins, and attempted to tell each other’s fortunes.

When the celebration was over, they re-lit their hearth fires, which they had extinguished earlier that evening, from the sacred bonfire to help protect them during the coming winter.

By 43 A.D., the Roman Empire had conquered most of the Celtic territory. In the course of the four hundred years that they ruled the Celtic lands, two festivals of Roman origin and the traditional Celtic celebration of Samhain combined.

The first was Feralia, a day in late October when the Romans traditionally commemorated the passing of the dead. The second was a day to honor Pomona, the Roman goddess of fruit and trees. The symbol of Pomona is the apple and its incorporation into Samhain probably explains why we “bob” for apples today on Halloween.

On May 13, 609 A.D., Pope Boniface IV dedicated the Pantheon in Rome in honor of all Christian martyrs, and the Western Church established the Catholic feast of All Martyrs Day. Pope Gregory III later expanded the festival to include all saints as well as all martyrs and moved the date from May 13 to November 1.

By the 9th century, Christian influence had spread into Celtic lands, where it gradually blended with and supplanted the older Celtic rites. In 1000 A.D., the church would make November 2 All Souls’ Day, a day to honor the dead. It’s widely believed today that the church was attempting to replace the Celtic festival of the dead with a related church-sanctioned holiday.

All Souls Day and Samhain were celebrated with big bonfires, parades, and dressing up in costumes as saints, angels, and devils. The All Saints Day celebration was also called All-hallows or All-hallowmas (from Middle English Alholowmesse meaning All Saints’ Day) and the night before it, the traditional night of Samhain in the Celtic religion, was called All-Hallows Eve and, eventually, Halloween.

Halloween celebration was extremely limited in colonial New England because of the rigid Protestant belief systems there. Halloween was much more common in Maryland and the southern colonies.

As the beliefs and customs of different European ethnic groups, as well as the American Indians, meshed, a distinctly American version of Halloween began to emerge. The first celebrations included “play parties,” public events held to celebrate the harvest, where neighbors would share stories of the dead, tell each other’s fortunes, dance and sing.

Colonial Halloween festivities also featured the telling of ghost stories and mischief-making of all kinds. By the middle of the nineteenth century, annual autumn festivities were common, but Halloween was not yet celebrated everywhere in the country.

In the second half of the nineteenth century, immigrants flooded America. These new immigrants, especially the millions of Irish fleeing the Irish Potato Famine, helped to popularize Halloween celebrations nationally.

Borrowing from Irish and English traditions, Americans began to dress up in costumes and go house to house asking for food or money, a practice that eventually became today’s “trick-or-treat” tradition. Young women believed that on Halloween they could divine the name or appearance of their future husband by doing tricks with yarn, apple parings or mirrors.

In the late 1800s, there was a move in America to mold Halloween into a holiday more about community and neighborly get-togethers than about ghosts, pranks, and witchcraft. At the turn of the century, Halloween parties for both children and adults became the most common way to celebrate the day. Parties focused on games, foods of the season and festive costumes.

Newspapers and community leaders encouraged parents to take anything “frightening” or “grotesque” out of Halloween celebrations. Because of these efforts, Halloween lost most of its superstitious and religious overtones by the beginning of the twentieth century.

By the 1920s and 1930s, Halloween had become a secular, but a community-centered holiday, with parades and town-wide Halloween parties as the featured entertainment. Despite the best efforts of many schools and communities, vandalism began to plague some celebrations in many communities during this time.

By the 1950s, town leaders had successfully limited vandalism and Halloween had evolved into a holiday directed mainly at the young. Due to the high numbers of young children during the fifties baby boom, parties moved from town civic centers into the classroom or home, where they could be more easily accommodated.

Between 1920 and 1950, the centuries-old practice of trick-or-treating was also revived. Trick-or-treating was a relatively inexpensive way for an entire community to share the Halloween celebration. In theory, families could also prevent tricks being played on them by providing the neighborhood children with small treats.

Thus, a new American tradition was born, and it has continued to grow. Today, Americans spend an estimated $6 billion annually on Halloween, making it the country’s second largest commercial holiday after Christmas.

The American Halloween tradition of “trick-or-treating” probably dates back to the early All Souls’ Day parades in England. During the festivities, poor citizens would beg for food and families would give them pastries called “soul cakes” in return for their promise to pray for the family’s dead relatives.

People delivered soul cakes, encourage by their churches to replace the ancient practice of leaving food and wine for roaming spirits. The practice, known as  “going a-souling” was eventually taken up by children who would visit the houses in their neighborhood and be given ale, food, and money.

Dressing in costume for Halloween has both European and Celtic roots. Hundreds of years ago, winter was an uncertain and frightening time. Food supplies often ran low and, for the many people afraid of the dark, the short days of winter were full of constant worry.

It was believed that on Halloween, ghosts came back to the earthly world, people thought that they would meet ghosts if they left their homes. To avoid being recognized by these ghosts, people would wear masks when they left their homes after dark so that the ghosts would mistake them for fellow spirits.

On Halloween, to keep ghosts away from their houses, people would place bowls of food outside their homes to appease the ghosts and prevent them from attempting to enter.

Halloween has always been a holiday filled with mystery, magic, and superstition. It began as a Celtic end-of-summer festival during which people felt especially close to deceased relatives and friends. For these friendly spirits, they set places at the dinner table, left treats on doorsteps and along the side of the road and lit candles to help loved ones find their way back to the spirit world.

Today’s Halloween ghosts are often depicted as more fearsome and malevolent, and our customs and superstitions are scarier too. We avoid crossing paths with black cats, afraid that they might bring us bad luck. This idea has its roots in the Middle Ages when many people believed that witches avoided detection by turning themselves into black cats.

We try not to walk under ladders for the same reason. This superstition may have come from the ancient Egyptians, who believed in sacred triangles (it also may have something to do with the fact that walking under a leaning ladder is fairly unsafe). And around Halloween, especially, we try to avoid breaking mirrors, stepping on cracks in the road or spilling salt.

But what about the Halloween traditions and beliefs that today’s trick-or-treaters have forgotten all about? Many of these obsolete rituals focused on the future instead of the past and the living instead of the dead.

In particular, many had to do with helping young women find their future husbands and reassuring them that they would someday—with luck, by next Halloween—be married. In 18th-century Ireland, a matchmaking cook might bury a ring in her mashed potatoes on Halloween night, hoping to bring true love to the diner who found it.

In Scotland, fortune-tellers recommended that an eligible young woman name a hazelnut for each of her suitors and then toss the nuts into the fireplace. The nut that burned to ashes instead of  popping or exploding, the story went, represented the girl’s future husband. (In some versions of this legend, the opposite was true: The nut that burned away symbolized a love that would not last.)

Another tale had it that if a young woman ate a sugary concoction made out of walnuts, hazelnuts, and nutmeg before bed on Halloween night she would dream about her future husband.

Young women tossed apple-peels over their shoulders, hoping that the peels would fall on the floor in the shape of their future husbands’ initials; tried to learn about their futures by peering at egg yolks floating in a bowl of water; and stood in front of mirrors in darkened rooms, holding candles and looking over their shoulders for their husbands’ faces.

Other rituals were more competitive. At some Halloween parties, the first guest to find a burr on a chestnut-hunt would be the first to marry; at others, the first successful apple-bobber would be the first down the aisle.

Of course, whether we’re asking for romantic advice or trying to avoid seven years of bad luck, each one of these Halloween superstitions relies on the goodwill of the very same “spirits” whose presence the early Celts felt so keenly.

Barb Schrader
October 25, 2017

Functional Endocrinology of Ohio
Akron: 2800 S. Arlington Road, Akron, Ohio 44312 (330) 644-5488
Cleveland: 6200 Rockside Woods Blvd., Ste. 100, Independence, Ohio 44131 (216) 236-0060
Dr. Keith S. Ungar, Dr. David Hardy, Dr. Joseph Little, Chiropractic
Physicians

To schedule an appointment, click here.

http://www.history.com/topics/halloween/history-of-halloween

How Much Sleep Do You REALLY Need?

How Many ZZZZZs Do You Need To Be Healthy?

Ahhhh, nothing better than a good night of sleep. I am one of those people who knows I need a least 8 hours. I’ve been that way since I was a child. My parents have always said I never needed a bedtime because I would just go to bed when I was tired.

But do you really need 8 hours like they say? I went out and did some research to find out….

Here’s what I found out: [1]

Sleep is an important function for many reasons. When you sleep, your brain signals your body to release hormones and compounds that help:

  • decrease risk for health conditions
  • manage your hunger levels
  • maintain your immune system
  • retain memory

Researchers in the United Kingdom and Italy analyzed data from 16 separate studies conducted over 25 years, covering more than 1.3 million people and more than 100,000 deaths. They published their findings in the journal Sleep. Those who generally slept for less than six hours a night were 12 percent more likely to experience a premature death. People who slept more than eight to nine hours per night had an even higher risk, at 30 percent.

Researchers also found that people who reduced their sleep time from seven hours to five hours or less had 1.7 times the risk of death from all causes.

People who are sleep-deprived:

  • have a harder time receiving information due to the brain’s overworked neurons
  • may interpret events differently
  • tend to have impaired judgment
  • lose their ability to access previous information

It’s important to get seven to eight hours of sleep so that you can experience all the sleep stages. No one stage is responsible for memory and learning. Two stages (rapid eye movement and slow wave sleep) contribute to:

  • creative thinking
  • procedural memory
  • long-term memories
  • memory processing

I know it’s hard to make sleep one of your top priorities. We all have such busy lives and we let our phones and TV’s keep us up, which then makes it tougher for us to fall asleep.

We need to keep sleep our top priority [2]:

“Sleep helps heal and repair our heart and blood vessels, and thus sleep deficiency can lead to an increased risk of heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, and stroke. Over time, lack of sleep can lead to obesity. During our sleep, the body helps maintain and balance our hormones. If we don’t get enough sleep hormones like ghrelin (signals hunger) and leptin (signals satiety) become imbalanced. Ghrelin increases and leptin decreases. In addition, sleep also affects how our bodies react to insulin, the hormone that controls our blood glucose (sugar). Lack of sleep is linked to high blood sugar. Our sensitivity to insulin greatly decreases with inadequate sleep. In addition, sleep aids healthy growth and development. Human growth hormone is excreted during sleep, and research suggests that it’s during REM (Rapid Eye Movement) sleep that the body is able to: restore organs, bones, and tissue; replenish immune cells, and circulate human growth hormone for strong muscles and bones.”

TIPS FOR GETTING ADEQUATE SLEEP

  1. Download filters for your phone and/or laptop (check out lux) to reduce blue light and power electronics down 1 hour before bed
  2. Try a meditation app (check out Calm, Headspace, or the Mindfulness App)
  3. Use Low Blue Lights glasses, lighting, and filters in your home
  4. Stick to a sleep schedule – try to sleep and wake at consistent times
  5. Reduce or eliminate caffeine, nicotine, and alcohol before sleep
  6. Include physical activity in your daily routine (limit within 2 hours of bedtime)
  7. Increase bright light exposure during the day – natural sunlight during the day helps keep our circadian rhythm healthy
  8. Decrease the temperature of your bedroom slightly
  9. Relax and clear your mind in the evening – try reading, journaling, stretching, or prayer

Personally, I’ve started to listen to an audiobook or podcast. Something easy and relaxing will whisk me off to sleep quickly. I’m usually asleep within 15 minutes of when I lay my head down on my pillow.

Nancy Boardman
October 4, 2017

Functional Endocrinology of Ohio
Akron: 2800 S. Arlington Road, Akron, Ohio 44312 (330) 644-5488
Cleveland: 6200 Rockside Woods Blvd., Ste. 100, Independence, Ohio 44131 (216) 236-0060
Dr. Keith S. Ungar, Dr. David Hardy, Dr. Joseph Little, Chiropractic Physicians

To schedule an appointment, click here.

[1] http://www.healthline.com/health/science-sleep-why-you-need-7-8-hours-night#overview1
[2] https://www.hitenutrition.com/blog/2017/7/10/why-you-should-make-sleep-a-top-priority

 

20 Ideas For The Best Fall Ever!

20 Ideas For The Best Fall Ever by Real Wellness Doc

Fall Family Fun

Everyone knows that I am a summer lover.  I love the sunshine and the heat.  I love beaches and swimming and wearing flip-flops.  But, autumn is in the air.  The leaves are changing colors, the days are getting shorter and the air is getting cooler.  Snow will be here before we know it.

When the weather gets colder, we find ourselves in the house much more.  We sit and watch TV.  We snuggle on the couch.  We don’t go outside and exercise.  We get a little lazy and a little depressed.  But I have decided that I am not going to let that happen this Fall.  I am going to enjoy the change of seasons.  So, I came up with some fun activities I am going to do.  Here are some of my ideas:

Continue reading 20 Ideas For The Best Fall Ever!