Health Problems Are Really an Energy Problem!

Everything in the Human Body Runs Off ENERGY

Or at least that’s the first thing to evaluate and fix before moving onto other health problems. The first thing in the body that gets burned into energy is sugar and carbs, followed by fats and then if we have to, proteins. After stating this I often hear people say: “Well I’m not diabetic so this can’t be my problem.” WRONG, you don’t have to be a full-blown diabetic to have energy problems.  Pre-diabetes, hypoglycemia, and issues with fat metabolism could all be issues.  Or, you are lacking the proper cofactors for energy metabolism or have a poor diet causing dysglycemia.  There could be several energy issues going on other than diabetes. Diabetes is just a diagnosis of a process that has been out of control for a while. Of course, it’s one of the biggest energy problems and if you have it you probably already are having other health problems and complications. In which case you need to watch our diabetes video. Regardless, if there is an energy problem, in the body it can lead to other problems and here are a few examples.

Hormone Problems

Guess what?  Insulin, your major blood sugar regulator, is a hormone! Hormones are chemical messengers the body produces in the body that make physiological changes. Hormones are the slower messenger system in the body and your nervous system is the fast messenger system in the body. Your endocrine system is the network of glands that produce your hormones and there is a feedback loop that goes back up to the brain to regulate your endocrine system. Whereas healthcare has separated this into each gland with specialist doctors, the endocrine system is actually a connected system of all the hormone-producing glands, your nervous system, and your immune system as well. This vast interconnected system is your neuroendocrine-immune system.  The operation of the neuroendocrine system requires a lot of energy.   Insulin causes other hormones to work and be produced. Do you think your body is going to think about reproduction if it doesn’t have the energy available to do that? You need energy before your body can send the message to do something.

Brain Problems

The brain, nicknamed the greedy master, uses roughly about 25 percent of all the energy we take in. So it is in constant need of energy. Not just that, it is reliant on the body to supply it with glucose for energy because neurons cannot store its own source of energy. Therefore any dip or spike in your blood glucose levels is toxic to the brain. To top it off any surges or crashes in your insulin affect the pathways for your serotonin and dopamine production. Perhaps you have noticed this after a lunch rich in sugars while attempting to be productive at work during the afternoon.

 Sleep Problems

Even when you are sleeping, your body needs a supply of energy.  Cortisol controls your sleep-wake cycle or circadian rhythm.   Cortisol is a glucocorticoid hormone (Gluco meaning glucose/sugar and corticoid meaning produced by the adrenal glands). Your cortisol levels should be low at night and high in the morning. The reason for this is because at night you need stable blood sugars because you will not need as much energy while you sleep. However, when you wake up, your blood sugars are lower because you are not eating while you sleep and you need a burst of energy to get up, so your cortisol levels elevate.  Therefore, a dysregulated energy system is a dysregulated sleep system!

Get your energy levels in check and get your health in check.

Dr. David R.A. Hardy, D.C.,
November 29, 2017

Functional Endocrinology of Ohio
Akron: 2800 S. Arlington Road, Akron, Ohio 44312 (330) 644-5488
Cleveland: 6200 Rockside Woods Blvd., Ste. 100, Independence, Ohio 44131 (216) 236-0060
Dr. Keith S. Ungar, Dr. David Hardy, Dr. Joseph Little, Chiropractic Physicians

To schedule an appointment, click here.

 

If Your Brain Was a Restaurant

The Primitive Reptilian Brain – The Back of the Restaurant

In every restaurant, the entire operation is completely and undeniably reliant on the back of the restaurant. This area is your prep area, your dishwasher, your equipment and your supply storage, fridge and freezer. No one ever walks into a restaurant and says I bet I’m having a great dining experience because everything is running smoothly in the back.

However, if this area of the restaurant was in chaos there is no way the rest of the place could function smoothly or efficiently. Well, unfortunately, this is how society and healthcare have looked at the brain. It has completely ignored the primitive brain. The primitive brain is the area of the brain that controls all your vital function (heart rate, blood pressure, respiration, digestion, etc.) It is the area that times and coördinates thoughts and movements, the areas that tell you where you are in your environment, the areas that keep you from falling, and the areas that keep you alert.  This area and the vast number of functions is the place where we are constantly seeing health problems. Let’s be completely honest; if these areas don’t function well, the rest of the brain gets frustrated! It would be analogous to an angry chef like we’ve all seen on the TV shows. They would be yelling and screaming; hey get me clean pans; slice those mushrooms and those d*** radishes. Primitive functions need to happen in order for advanced functions to happen.

The Limbic brain – The Front of the Restaurant

The front of the restaurant is the experience!  “Oh, she was such a nice person.   Oh, she brought everything out on time!”   This is like the limbic part of our brain.  And, just like the front of the restaurant gets grief from the back of the restaurant, our emotional/limbic lobes are constantly being bombarded from our primitive brain. For example, how do you feel if you are dizzy or disoriented? How do you feel when your heart is pounding through your chest? How do you feel when you can’t get a deep breath? How do you feel when a million things are being thrown at you? Over-stimulate you? Do you ever feel so defeated from this that you want to act like the waitress that tells the dishwasher to take a hike as she storms off out the back door and behind the dumpster for a big deep drag of her cigarette with shaking hands? Wow! I’m so sorry; I don’t know why I’m so emotional. 😊

The Cortex – The Chef   

The part of the restaurant that gets all the headlines and the area of the brain that gets all the attention is the cortex. However, the purpose of the chef area of the brain (the cortex) is to herd cats; even more so than being creative or intelligent. It is trying to tell the emotional areas to chill out; it is directing and attempting to make sense out of all the nonsense being thrown at it from other parts of the brain. If these other areas aren’t doing their basic job, it screams at them and tries to organize this complete chaos. Eventually, though, there is only so much screaming ones’ head can do! Then it will begin to slow down and shut down for moments at a time, Then, these moments happen more often, until the cortex completely fails and/or the restaurant closes.  “Oh, why can’t I think clearly anymore and nothing makes sense with all this noise!”

So, now you know – the best restaurants need a great back of the house, a front of the house, and a chef to keep it all in order.  Your brain needs the same thing – a healthy primitive brain, limbic brain and cortex for the body to work at its best.  So many of us ignore the signs of a brain function imbalance and/or do not have any idea what to do about it.  That is where a functional neurologist can help.  Click here to learn more about functional neurology.

Dr. David R.A. Hardy, DC, DACNB, FABBIR
October 31, 2017

Functional Endocrinology of Ohio
Akron: 2800 S. Arlington Road, Akron, Ohio 44312 (330) 644-5488
Cleveland: 6200 Rockside Woods Blvd., Ste. 100, Independence, Ohio 44131 (216) 236-0060
Dr. Keith S. Ungar, Dr. David Hardy, Dr. Joseph Little, Chiropractic Physicians

To schedule an appointment, click here.

Concussions: A Mom’s Perspective

It’s official, the 2017 High School Football Season has begun!  Watching my Son play football under the Friday night lights is one of my favorite things to do this time of year. His commitment, his dedication, and his hard work are paying off. Involving our children in sports has always been a priority in our family.    The commitment provides an opportunity to gain greater self-awareness, develop better social skills and commit to a consistent exercise regimen. Becoming actively involved in a sport provides a wealth of health benefits.  Playing a sport can improve efficient functioning of the heart, improve blood circulation, lower hypertension, and lower stress levels. Being part of a team also teaches so many valuable life lessons such as commitment, comradery and mental and physical toughness.  We can do great things when we keep up our physical and mental well-being!

  Although I enjoy watching my son progress and excel at his favorite sport, the sport itself is downright dangerous.  I worry about the next practice, the next play, the next hit or even the after effects of it all.  Last season, I received the call that my son, during practice, took a very hard hit to the head.  It was the second week of football practice and already my son had been hit so hard that he suffered a loss of consciousness, confusion, blurred vision, and a constant headache that would not ease up.   Although there were very real signs and symptoms of a concussion in my son’s case, that may not always be the case.  Often times, the signs and symptoms are subtle and are not always apparent immediately.   Concussions can happen in an instant. Yet they can have a lasting impact on a young athlete.  It is Important to know the warning signs and follow through with a treatment plan to reduce long-term effects. Your brain can heal itself.  However, just because your athlete may feel better doesn’t mean that the brain is healed.  According to Dr. David Hardy, Chiropractic Neurologist at Functional Endocrinology of Ohio, the brain takes time to heal.  Often times the brain compensates during the process and if not properly diagnosed and treated may lead to a more severe concussion to follow often resulting in worse damage than the first.

Be aware of the signs:

  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Sensitivity to light and sound
  • Headaches
  • Blurred vision
  • Dizziness or confusion
  • Trouble thinking or remembering
  • Speech problems
  • Feeling sleepy or a change in sleep pattern
  • Loss of consciousness (This doesn’t always have to happen)

Know what to do:

  • Seek medical attention, get checked out to assess the extent of the concussion. Become as involved as possible in the care and management plan to help prevent or lessen the long-term effects or injury.
  • Rest
  • Maintain a healthy diet
  • Seek neuro-rehabilitation. A trained functional neurologist is the best.
  • Keep open communication with your player. Make sure they know how important it is to communicate all symptoms

We are very fortunate to play for a high school program that provides our players with state of the art equipment and a professionally trained staff.  At the start of the season, players were all given base line testing or a preseason physical of the brain which records the normal neurological state.  In Sam’s case, the high school athletic department, trainer and coaching staff followed the proper protocol.  I know that I can’t shelter or protect my son but I will make sure to be equipped to recognize the signs and symptoms and know what to do in the case of an unfortunate head trauma or even a hard hit.

The most important way to equip your player is to encourage that they do not hide their symptoms.  Make sure that they know to report their symptoms to the high school trainer, coaching staff and parents.  Make sure that your player is always wearing protective gear.  If signs or symptoms are present, get checked out.  Whenever there is doubt, encourage them to sit out.

I feel very fortunate to work for a team of doctors committed to overall health and well-being.  This year, Dr. David Hardy, DC, DACNB, FABBIR joined our team at Functional Endocrinology of Ohio with an extensive background in Functional Neurology.  As an athlete himself, who competed in competitive rugby, high school football, and basketball, as well as Ironman competitions, his passion is treating all brain-related conditions but especially TBIs and concussions.  Even though I will always worry about that next practice, next hit, next play or even the after effects of it all, my doctors have educated my son and me about the proper protocols.  Because of this knowledge and guidance, I will know what to look for and how to aid in the recovery process.

When it comes to concussions, be aware and use your head!

Joy Vale
Patient Care Coordinator
September 6, 2017

Functional Endocrinology of Ohio

Akron: 2800 S. Arlington Road, Akron, Ohio 44312 (330) 644-5488
Cleveland: 6200 Rockside Woods Blvd., Ste. 100, Independence, Ohio 44131 (216) 236-0060
Dr. Keith S. Ungar, Dr. Andrew Kender, Dr. David Hardy, Dr. Joseph Little, Chiropractic Physicians

To schedule an appointment, click here.

 

What is Really Causing Your Balance Problems

Do you ever have difficulty walking or maintaining your balance? Are you afraid of falling if you don’t have something to hold onto? Have you noticed that your stance is wider than it was? If you close your eyes, are you unable to stand without swaying or falling?

If you answered “yes” to any of the above questions, you have a balance issue which is a warning sign of compromised brain health.  Three main systems govern your balance: feedback from the muscles and joints of your extremities, your vestibular system (inner ear), and your cerebellar cortex. In this post, I will direct our focus to the cerebellum.

  Located at the base of the brain, this area is primarily responsible for precision, coordination and timing aspects of motor movements and cognitive processes. The health of the cerebellum is extremely important as it provides a constant flow of information to other areas of the brain, which is vital for proper brain function.

When cerebellar function begins to decline we see problems in our balance, changes in cognitive and motor performance, and disturbances in other body functions. This also disrupts the constant flow of information from this area to other brain regions. This can, in turn, cause problems in other areas of the brain leading to seemingly unrelated symptoms, including anxiety, fatigue, restless leg syndrome, movement disorders, depression, and many other conditions.

Therefore, changes in balance and coordination of movement are carefully evaluated by a healthcare professional. Recognizing these potential signs of poor brain function may help find and stop long-term neurodegenerative conditions down the road.

Dr. Joseph M. Little
August 30, 2017

Functional Endocrinology of Ohio
Akron: 2800 S. Arlington Road, Akron, Ohio 44312 (330) 644-5488
Cleveland: 6200 Rockside Woods Blvd., Ste. 100, Independence, Ohio 44131 (216) 236-0060

Dr. Keith S. Ungar, Dr. Andrew Kender, Dr. David Hardy, Dr. Joseph Little, Chiropractic Physicians

To schedule an appointment, click here.