5 Ways to Maintain Your Brain

Maintain Your Brain

You know exercise is important, right? I work in the Neurological Therapy Department at Functional Endocrinology of Ohio and it’s important to know that, just like your body, you have to exercise your brain. After all; if you don’t use it, you lose it. Here are a few simple exercises that will keep your brain stimulated.

Gaze Stabilization: Hold your thumb in front of you at eye level, while focusing on your thumb. Turn your head slowly from side to side 15 times each direction. This exercise is the most basic form of an eye movement and will work on your eye’s ability to lock on to a stationary target.

Cross Body Complex Movements: Using your right arm and your left leg, (sit if needed), draw an infinity sign in front of you. Try to move as many joints and be as meticulous as possible for the most cerebellum stimulation. To make it a little more difficult, try going in opposite directions. Then do the other side.

Point Localization: Find any stationary point, whether it be a mole on your arm or a dot on the wall.  A refrigerator magnet with a dot on it works well because it can be moved.  Focus on the point. Close your eyes and touch the point with the tip of your index finger. Repeat 3-5 times with each finger on each hand changing your point after every few touches. This will stimulate your parietal lobe.

Math: Pretty simple, do some math. Make sure you actually have to put a little thought into it. If you’re more of a puzzle person, mazes are also a good way to fire off your frontal lobe.

Your brain is very complex. It’s a network of pathways leading from lobe to lobe, sending signals to get your eyes, hands, legs, and the rest of your body to do what you want them to do. It would need a neurological evaluation, (which we do at the office), to decide exactly what therapies you would need based on your specific neurological deficiencies. With that being said, this is a general maintenance guide that, if done regularly, will help to keep your brain in shape.

Dallas Cain
May 9, 2018

Functional Endocrinology of Ohio
Akron: 2800 S. Arlington Road, Akron, Ohio 44312 (330) 644-5488
Cleveland: 6200 Rockside Woods Blvd., Ste. 100, Independence, Ohio 44131 (216) 236-0060
Dr. Keith S. Ungar, Chiropractic Physician

To schedule an appointment, click here.

The Interaction of Dopamine levels and Proper Breathing – Breath Your Way to Good Health!

Sometimes there is an easy common sense way to explain what looks like a complex scientific process. For instance, I recently came across a research article explaining that in rat studies dopamine was synthesized better at a lower pH. In fact, the ideal pH was 6.1 (slightly acidic) and dopamine formation actually decreased in comparison by 25% when the pH was 7.4 (slightly alkaline). Dopamine is a chemical molecule used in the brain to signal and basically functions to activate a sense of arousal and motivation in our brains, dopamine is not only tied to our motivation and reward systems it also fires through and kick-starts the motor and autonomic systems. Whenever you hear activation of the brain you also have to understand that activation and motivation in the brain mean movement. To say that differently, we are activated and motivated to do something; that requires us to move and it makes perfect sense that if we are motivated to do something then we move. This is the hard wiring of the brain and you can’t separate thinking, emotion and movement, they are wired together. Think about it what happens to our muscles and breathing when we move or exercise? We start to produce CO2 in our muscles, we breathe deeper, the ratio of inhalation to exhalation changes and during this process our blood becomes more acidic due to the gaseous exchange of CO2 and oxygen, as well as the build-up of lactic acid in our muscles. This process has a huge effect on our health! So let’s looking at three common disorders where breathing and exercise can have a simple and profound impact.

Parkinson’s Disease

In Parkinson’s disease, the part of the brain that produces dopamine (the substantia nigra) has degenerated and there is a lack of dopamine produced. To make this worse breathing becomes difficult because the posturing of the person becomes worse as the disease develops, forcing the person to become hunched over causing rigidity in the spine and ribs. If you would like to experience what it’s like roll your shoulders in and slouch foreward, now try to take in a deep breath; compare that to standing up nice and tall with shoulders back while you take in a nice deep breath. Then imagine every breath you take throughout your day is a struggle like the first one. Good news is even with Parkinson’s Disease you can exercise your breathing, therefore change your body’s pH and hopefully improve the likelihood of producing dopamine more efficiently.

ADHD

Dopamine fires up to the brain’s frontal lobes (our thinking centers) and allows us to be focused and alert. Studies have shown that these regions are smaller in an ADHD student’s brain. Studies have also shown that exercise can improve the symptoms of ADHD. Based on this and what we have explained about breathing we suggest that frequent burst of exercise that changes a person’s breathing will have a positive effect on focus, alertness, and thinking.

Anxiety

Have a look at people who are anxious and see what their breathing is like, or next time you feel anxious pay attention to how you are breathing. You will see that the breaths are short and shallow. They usually are coming from the upper ribs and neck muscles. This causes a person’s CO2 to be breathed off, therefore causing a decrease in pH and therefore decrease the chances of producing dopamine efficiently. Not good if you would like to think clearly. Bag breathing can be used in these situations and hey exercise that changes our breathing will have an even greater effect.

There are many breathing techniques out there; a simple one we recommend is to breath with a ratio of twice as long on the exhale. Start by placing your hand on your belly and push out against your hand as you breath in through your nose, feel the breath come up your lower ribs and move up through the chest stopping at full inhalation at the top of the shoulders, then slowly breath out through the mouth relaxing your neck and shoulders first, feel the breath slowly come down, relaxing the ribs and finishing by pulling the stomach in. The pace should be comfortable; the hardest part for several people is timing the exhalation to be slow and twice as long as the inhalation. So choose a ratio that is doable (ex. 4 seconds in/8 seconds out) then increase as you get better (ex. 10 seconds in/20 seconds out). Enjoy the rich free oxygen and improve your brain’s ability to produce dopamine.

Dr. David Hardy, D.C.
April 25, 2018

Functional Endocrinology of Ohio
Akron: 2800 S. Arlington Road, Akron, Ohio 44312 (330) 644-5488
Cleveland: 6200 Rockside Woods Blvd., Ste. 100, Independence, Ohio 44131 (216) 236-0060
Dr. Keith S. Ungar, Chiropractic Physician

To schedule an appointment, click here.

Sources:

The effects of pH on dopamine and serotonin synthesis by rat brain striatal synaptosomes: Manoucher, Messripour, Year: 1992 | Volume: 24 | Issue Number: 1 | Page: 32-35

Brain development and ADHD: Amy L.Kraina F. Xavier Castellanosa  Clinical Psychology Review, Volume 26, Issue 4, August 2006, Pages 433-444.

Physical Exercise Alleviates ADHD Symptoms: Regional Deficits and Development Trajectory: Trevor Archer, Richard M. Kostrzewa Neurotoxicity Research
February 2012, Volume 21, Issue 2, pp 195–209.

 

Are You Breathing The Right Way? Tools To Oxygenate Your Brain and Body

How often do you think about your breathing? If you’re thinking to yourself, “Well I’ve only done it my entire life, I know how to breathe”, my question to you is, are you sure? I’m not saying there’s a “right” way to breath, but the breathing exercise I will teach you allows you to get a deeper, fuller breath.

First, put your hand on your stomach and push in just a little bit. This is where you should expand as you inhale. Take a deep breath in through your nose and let the air fill your lungs, pushing your hand up. Your entire body, from your point of pressure to your chest, should expand if you are doing the exercise properly.  Then exhale through your mouth for twice as long as you inhaled. You should exhale all the air from your lungs, and your hand should lower as you exhale. Once you feel you have cleared the air, repeat. If you find yourself struggling to expand at the stomach properly, try it laying or sitting down.

Well, I hope you choose to start this or another breathing exercise into your daily routine. Remember, our minds and body’s need oxygen to survive, so be sure you’re getting enough of it. Even a couple good, deep breaths can help you get the oxygen you need.

Here are more examples of breathing exercises. I enjoyed learning about #4:  https://greatist.com/happiness/breathing-exercises-relax

Nadi Shodhana or “Alternate Nostril Breathing”

How it’s done: A yogi’s best friend, this breath brings calm, balance, and unite the right and left sides of the brain. Starting in a comfortable meditative pose, hold the right thumb over the right nostril and inhale deeply through the left nostril. At the peak of inhalation, close off the left nostril with the ring finger, then exhale through the right nostril. Continue the pattern, inhaling through the right nostril, closing it off with the right thumb, and exhaling through the left nostril.

When it works best: Crunch time, or when it’s time to focus or energize. Just don’t try this one before bed: Nadi Shodhana “clears the channels” and make people feel more awake. “It’s almost like a cup of coffee,” Pacheco says.

Level of difficulty: Intermediate

Some scientific information on breathing and your brain:  www.forbes.com/sites/daviddisalvo/2013/05/14/breathing-and-your-brain-five-reasons-to-grab-the-controls/#4bcd5cf72d95

“Your lung capacity is the total amount of air that your lungs can hold. Over time, our lung capacity and lung function typically decrease slowly as we age after our mid-20s. Some conditions like chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) can significantly speed up these reductions in lung capacity and functioning. This leads to difficulty in breathing and shortness of breath.”   Fortunately, there are exercises that can help support and increase lung capacity, making it easier to keep your lungs healthy and get your body the oxygen.

And last you can use breathing exercises to help you fall asleep.

5 Breathing Exercises to Reduce Stress & Improve Sleep – https://draxe.com/breathing-exercises/

I hope this information has helped you to Breathe, Breathe, Breathe.

Dallas Cain
March 7, 2018

Functional Endocrinology of Ohio
Akron: 2800 S. Arlington Road, Akron, Ohio 44312 (330) 644-5488
Cleveland: 6200 Rockside Woods Blvd., Ste. 100, Independence, Ohio 44131 (216) 236-0060
Dr. Keith S. Ungar and Dr. David Hardy, Chiropractic Physicians

To schedule an appointment, click here.

3 Tips to Make Your Job or Career Change a Healthy One!

There is no doubt that switching a job or career is a stressful event in anyone’s life often causing people anxiety and affecting their health when they need to be at their best. This is even worse if you were fired or laid off from your job. In this case, a person’s stress level ranks 8th out of all major life stressors on the Holmes and Rahe scale at a 47. To put that in perspective, number one at a rating of 100 is the death of a spouse. What is also amazing is how often people are changing careers and jobs in our current job market; the average person will change careers 5-7 times during their working lives. On top of that, about 30% of the total workforce will change jobs every 12 months. This is a lot of people who are walking around with a highly increased stress level and that is taking a serious toll on their health. For instance, increased and prolonged stress can cause higher blood pressure, heart conditions, sleeping problems, upset stomach, diabetes, decreased energy levels, brain fog, depression and anxiety just to name a few. So what can we do to combat the harmful effects of this stressful event but also help a person’s brain and body to excel in their next career chapter?

Adrenal Support

The adrenal glands are the factories for producing the body’s stress hormone, cortisol, and these glands work overtime to keep up with the racing thoughts and uncertainty. So to support these tiny glands, it is wise to avoid substances that are going to cause your adrenal glands to pump more cortisol before the well runs dry and a person is left in a state of constant fatigue.  Stay away from caffeinated beverages, sodas and coffee the best you can. On top that any substance that affects your blood sugars will have an effect on your cortisol levels, such things like sugary snacks and food, high carbohydrate foods and alcoholic beverages. Exercise is key to helping the body use up your stress hormones and decrease the effects of having excess cortisol in the system. Supplementation can also help keep these important glands health. The clinical research has several references to the health benefits of adaptogenic herbs. These herbs help to support your body and keep your body’s chemistry within range.

Brain training

Everybody has strengths and weaknesses in their brains; there are functional differences in the way certain pathways fire in the brain and how active or under active these pathways are. More importantly, a qualified healthcare practitioner trained in functional neurology can name this weakness in your brains function and then match it up with a treatment or exercise to make these pathways work better. This is not only important to help rehab the damage that is going on in person’s brain when they are under stress but to also getting that person’s brain firing better so they can do their next adventure.

Neurofeedback 

This is a great treatment modality to help a person regulate the electrical activity in their brain. The first step is to do a brain map were a cap with 19 different sensors read the electrical activity in a person’s brain. It is then compared to a statistical analysis comparing 1000s of other people who are the same age and gender to see what parts of the brain have too much or too little activity. After we gather this information, it is time to train that part of your brain through operant conditioning. This is when we reward a person’s brain when it is in a good brainwave frequency. We reward through sound, a video or through a game. The overall outcome is a sharper calmer brain.

A new career or job is exciting.  Get yourself ready!

Dr. David Hardy, DC
February 21, 2018

Functional Endocrinology of Ohio
Akron: 2800 S. Arlington Road, Akron, Ohio 44312 (330) 644-5488
Cleveland: 6200 Rockside Woods Blvd., Ste. 100, Independence, Ohio 44131 (216) 236-0060
Dr. Keith S. Ungar and Dr. David Hardy, Chiropractic Physicians

To schedule an appointment, click here.

References:
http://www.careers-advice-online.com/career-change-statistics.html
https://www.stress.org/holmes-rahe-stress-inventory/

Health Problems Are Really an Energy Problem!

Everything in the Human Body Runs Off ENERGY

Or at least that’s the first thing to evaluate and fix before moving onto other health problems. The first thing in the body that gets burned into energy is sugar and carbs, followed by fats and then if we have to, proteins. After stating this I often hear people say: “Well I’m not diabetic so this can’t be my problem.” WRONG, you don’t have to be a full-blown diabetic to have energy problems.  Pre-diabetes, hypoglycemia, and issues with fat metabolism could all be issues.  Or, you are lacking the proper cofactors for energy metabolism or have a poor diet causing dysglycemia.  There could be several energy issues going on other than diabetes. Diabetes is just a diagnosis of a process that has been out of control for a while. Of course, it’s one of the biggest energy problems and if you have it you probably already are having other health problems and complications. In which case you need to watch our diabetes video. Regardless, if there is an energy problem, in the body it can lead to other problems and here are a few examples.

Hormone Problems

Guess what?  Insulin, your major blood sugar regulator, is a hormone! Hormones are chemical messengers the body produces in the body that make physiological changes. Hormones are the slower messenger system in the body and your nervous system is the fast messenger system in the body. Your endocrine system is the network of glands that produce your hormones and there is a feedback loop that goes back up to the brain to regulate your endocrine system. Whereas healthcare has separated this into each gland with specialist doctors, the endocrine system is actually a connected system of all the hormone-producing glands, your nervous system, and your immune system as well. This vast interconnected system is your neuroendocrine-immune system.  The operation of the neuroendocrine system requires a lot of energy.   Insulin causes other hormones to work and be produced. Do you think your body is going to think about reproduction if it doesn’t have the energy available to do that? You need energy before your body can send the message to do something.

Brain Problems

The brain, nicknamed the greedy master, uses roughly about 25 percent of all the energy we take in. So it is in constant need of energy. Not just that, it is reliant on the body to supply it with glucose for energy because neurons cannot store its own source of energy. Therefore any dip or spike in your blood glucose levels is toxic to the brain. To top it off any surges or crashes in your insulin affect the pathways for your serotonin and dopamine production. Perhaps you have noticed this after a lunch rich in sugars while attempting to be productive at work during the afternoon.

 Sleep Problems

Even when you are sleeping, your body needs a supply of energy.  Cortisol controls your sleep-wake cycle or circadian rhythm.   Cortisol is a glucocorticoid hormone (Gluco meaning glucose/sugar and corticoid meaning produced by the adrenal glands). Your cortisol levels should be low at night and high in the morning. The reason for this is because at night you need stable blood sugars because you will not need as much energy while you sleep. However, when you wake up, your blood sugars are lower because you are not eating while you sleep and you need a burst of energy to get up, so your cortisol levels elevate.  Therefore, a dysregulated energy system is a dysregulated sleep system!

Get your energy levels in check and get your health in check.

Dr. David R.A. Hardy, D.C.,
November 29, 2017

Functional Endocrinology of Ohio
Akron: 2800 S. Arlington Road, Akron, Ohio 44312 (330) 644-5488
Cleveland: 6200 Rockside Woods Blvd., Ste. 100, Independence, Ohio 44131 (216) 236-0060
Dr. Keith S. Ungar, Dr. David Hardy, Dr. Joseph Little, Chiropractic Physicians

To schedule an appointment, click here.

 

If Your Brain Was a Restaurant

The Primitive Reptilian Brain – The Back of the Restaurant

In every restaurant, the entire operation is completely and undeniably reliant on the back of the restaurant. This area is your prep area, your dishwasher, your equipment and your supply storage, fridge and freezer. No one ever walks into a restaurant and says I bet I’m having a great dining experience because everything is running smoothly in the back.

However, if this area of the restaurant was in chaos there is no way the rest of the place could function smoothly or efficiently. Well, unfortunately, this is how society and healthcare have looked at the brain. It has completely ignored the primitive brain. The primitive brain is the area of the brain that controls all your vital function (heart rate, blood pressure, respiration, digestion, etc.) It is the area that times and coördinates thoughts and movements, the areas that tell you where you are in your environment, the areas that keep you from falling, and the areas that keep you alert.  This area and the vast number of functions is the place where we are constantly seeing health problems. Let’s be completely honest; if these areas don’t function well, the rest of the brain gets frustrated! It would be analogous to an angry chef like we’ve all seen on the TV shows. They would be yelling and screaming; hey get me clean pans; slice those mushrooms and those d*** radishes. Primitive functions need to happen in order for advanced functions to happen.

The Limbic brain – The Front of the Restaurant

The front of the restaurant is the experience!  “Oh, she was such a nice person.   Oh, she brought everything out on time!”   This is like the limbic part of our brain.  And, just like the front of the restaurant gets grief from the back of the restaurant, our emotional/limbic lobes are constantly being bombarded from our primitive brain. For example, how do you feel if you are dizzy or disoriented? How do you feel when your heart is pounding through your chest? How do you feel when you can’t get a deep breath? How do you feel when a million things are being thrown at you? Over-stimulate you? Do you ever feel so defeated from this that you want to act like the waitress that tells the dishwasher to take a hike as she storms off out the back door and behind the dumpster for a big deep drag of her cigarette with shaking hands? Wow! I’m so sorry; I don’t know why I’m so emotional. 😊

The Cortex – The Chef   

The part of the restaurant that gets all the headlines and the area of the brain that gets all the attention is the cortex. However, the purpose of the chef area of the brain (the cortex) is to herd cats; even more so than being creative or intelligent. It is trying to tell the emotional areas to chill out; it is directing and attempting to make sense out of all the nonsense being thrown at it from other parts of the brain. If these other areas aren’t doing their basic job, it screams at them and tries to organize this complete chaos. Eventually, though, there is only so much screaming ones’ head can do! Then it will begin to slow down and shut down for moments at a time, Then, these moments happen more often, until the cortex completely fails and/or the restaurant closes.  “Oh, why can’t I think clearly anymore and nothing makes sense with all this noise!”

So, now you know – the best restaurants need a great back of the house, a front of the house, and a chef to keep it all in order.  Your brain needs the same thing – a healthy primitive brain, limbic brain and cortex for the body to work at its best.  So many of us ignore the signs of a brain function imbalance and/or do not have any idea what to do about it.  That is where a functional neurologist can help.  Click here to learn more about functional neurology.

Dr. David R.A. Hardy, DC, DACNB, FABBIR
October 31, 2017

Functional Endocrinology of Ohio
Akron: 2800 S. Arlington Road, Akron, Ohio 44312 (330) 644-5488
Cleveland: 6200 Rockside Woods Blvd., Ste. 100, Independence, Ohio 44131 (216) 236-0060
Dr. Keith S. Ungar, Dr. David Hardy, Dr. Joseph Little, Chiropractic Physicians

To schedule an appointment, click here.

Concussions: A Mom’s Perspective

It’s official, the 2017 High School Football Season has begun!  Watching my Son play football under the Friday night lights is one of my favorite things to do this time of year. His commitment, his dedication, and his hard work are paying off. Involving our children in sports has always been a priority in our family.    The commitment provides an opportunity to gain greater self-awareness, develop better social skills and commit to a consistent exercise regimen. Becoming actively involved in a sport provides a wealth of health benefits.  Playing a sport can improve efficient functioning of the heart, improve blood circulation, lower hypertension, and lower stress levels. Being part of a team also teaches so many valuable life lessons such as commitment, comradery and mental and physical toughness.  We can do great things when we keep up our physical and mental well-being!

  Although I enjoy watching my son progress and excel at his favorite sport, the sport itself is downright dangerous.  I worry about the next practice, the next play, the next hit or even the after effects of it all.  Last season, I received the call that my son, during practice, took a very hard hit to the head.  It was the second week of football practice and already my son had been hit so hard that he suffered a loss of consciousness, confusion, blurred vision, and a constant headache that would not ease up.   Although there were very real signs and symptoms of a concussion in my son’s case, that may not always be the case.  Often times, the signs and symptoms are subtle and are not always apparent immediately.   Concussions can happen in an instant. Yet they can have a lasting impact on a young athlete.  It is Important to know the warning signs and follow through with a treatment plan to reduce long-term effects. Your brain can heal itself.  However, just because your athlete may feel better doesn’t mean that the brain is healed.  According to Dr. David Hardy, Chiropractic Neurologist at Functional Endocrinology of Ohio, the brain takes time to heal.  Often times the brain compensates during the process and if not properly diagnosed and treated may lead to a more severe concussion to follow often resulting in worse damage than the first.

Be aware of the signs:

  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Sensitivity to light and sound
  • Headaches
  • Blurred vision
  • Dizziness or confusion
  • Trouble thinking or remembering
  • Speech problems
  • Feeling sleepy or a change in sleep pattern
  • Loss of consciousness (This doesn’t always have to happen)

Know what to do:

  • Seek medical attention, get checked out to assess the extent of the concussion. Become as involved as possible in the care and management plan to help prevent or lessen the long-term effects or injury.
  • Rest
  • Maintain a healthy diet
  • Seek neuro-rehabilitation. A trained functional neurologist is the best.
  • Keep open communication with your player. Make sure they know how important it is to communicate all symptoms

We are very fortunate to play for a high school program that provides our players with state of the art equipment and a professionally trained staff.  At the start of the season, players were all given base line testing or a preseason physical of the brain which records the normal neurological state.  In Sam’s case, the high school athletic department, trainer and coaching staff followed the proper protocol.  I know that I can’t shelter or protect my son but I will make sure to be equipped to recognize the signs and symptoms and know what to do in the case of an unfortunate head trauma or even a hard hit.

The most important way to equip your player is to encourage that they do not hide their symptoms.  Make sure that they know to report their symptoms to the high school trainer, coaching staff and parents.  Make sure that your player is always wearing protective gear.  If signs or symptoms are present, get checked out.  Whenever there is doubt, encourage them to sit out.

I feel very fortunate to work for a team of doctors committed to overall health and well-being.  This year, Dr. David Hardy, DC, DACNB, FABBIR joined our team at Functional Endocrinology of Ohio with an extensive background in Functional Neurology.  As an athlete himself, who competed in competitive rugby, high school football, and basketball, as well as Ironman competitions, his passion is treating all brain-related conditions but especially TBIs and concussions.  Even though I will always worry about that next practice, next hit, next play or even the after effects of it all, my doctors have educated my son and me about the proper protocols.  Because of this knowledge and guidance, I will know what to look for and how to aid in the recovery process.

When it comes to concussions, be aware and use your head!

Joy Vale
Patient Care Coordinator
September 6, 2017

Functional Endocrinology of Ohio

Akron: 2800 S. Arlington Road, Akron, Ohio 44312 (330) 644-5488
Cleveland: 6200 Rockside Woods Blvd., Ste. 100, Independence, Ohio 44131 (216) 236-0060
Dr. Keith S. Ungar, Dr. Andrew Kender, Dr. David Hardy, Dr. Joseph Little, Chiropractic Physicians

To schedule an appointment, click here.

 

What is Really Causing Your Balance Problems

Do you ever have difficulty walking or maintaining your balance? Are you afraid of falling if you don’t have something to hold onto? Have you noticed that your stance is wider than it was? If you close your eyes, are you unable to stand without swaying or falling?

If you answered “yes” to any of the above questions, you have a balance issue which is a warning sign of compromised brain health.  Three main systems govern your balance: feedback from the muscles and joints of your extremities, your vestibular system (inner ear), and your cerebellar cortex. In this post, I will direct our focus to the cerebellum.

  Located at the base of the brain, this area is primarily responsible for precision, coordination and timing aspects of motor movements and cognitive processes. The health of the cerebellum is extremely important as it provides a constant flow of information to other areas of the brain, which is vital for proper brain function.

When cerebellar function begins to decline we see problems in our balance, changes in cognitive and motor performance, and disturbances in other body functions. This also disrupts the constant flow of information from this area to other brain regions. This can, in turn, cause problems in other areas of the brain leading to seemingly unrelated symptoms, including anxiety, fatigue, restless leg syndrome, movement disorders, depression, and many other conditions.

Therefore, changes in balance and coordination of movement are carefully evaluated by a healthcare professional. Recognizing these potential signs of poor brain function may help find and stop long-term neurodegenerative conditions down the road.

Dr. Joseph M. Little
August 30, 2017

Functional Endocrinology of Ohio
Akron: 2800 S. Arlington Road, Akron, Ohio 44312 (330) 644-5488
Cleveland: 6200 Rockside Woods Blvd., Ste. 100, Independence, Ohio 44131 (216) 236-0060

Dr. Keith S. Ungar, Dr. Andrew Kender, Dr. David Hardy, Dr. Joseph Little, Chiropractic Physicians

To schedule an appointment, click here.