6 Refreshing Tastes of Summer!

 “Every time you eat is an opportunity to nourish yourself.” –superhealinglife.com

When I think of summer, I think of all the sweet smells and tastes of fresh fruits.  Summer is my favorite time of the year!  One of my favorite things to do is stroll through local farmer’s markets and take it all in!  I appreciate all the hard work of local farmers and honor them with my support.

I am always looking to add nutrients into my diet in the easiest way possible. Fresh smoothies will always be a go to for my family and me.  I love the sweet taste of pineapple paired with some fresh baby spinach.  Even though I am not a big fan of kale, when paired with a pungent punch of a granny smith apple, I can still get its health benefits into my diet.

Below I’m sharing 6 of my favorite smoothie combos hoping to inspire your creativity and allow you to take in all the health benefits of this season’s fresh fruits and vegetables.

Pineapple Lime Cilantro Smoothie    

Ingredients:  ½ frozen Banana
1 cup Cilantro
1 inch of Ginger
1 Lime, juice
1 ¼ cup of Pineapple
1 cup of Spinach
1 cup unsweetened Almond Milk
3 Ice Cubes

Instructions:  Place all ingredients into a high-speed blender and blend on high until creamy, smooth and delicious!

Blueberry Avocado Smoothie   
 
Ingredients:  ½ Avocado ripe
1 cup Baby spinach
½ cup Blueberries
1tsp. Grade B Maple Syrup
½ cup Almond Milk Yogurt
½ cup unsweetened Vanilla Almond Milk
5 Ice Cubes
Instructions:  Place all ingredients into a high-speed blender and blend on high until creamy, smooth and delicious!

Cherry Almond Smoothie  
 
Ingredients:  ½ frozen Banana
1 cup Fresh Baby Spinach
1/3 cup pitted Bing Cherries
2 tbsp. Almond Butter
1 cup unsweetened Vanilla Almond Milk
3 Ice Cubes
Instructions:  Place all ingredients into a high-speed blender and blend on high until creamy, smooth and delicious!

 Sunrise Super Smoothie  
 
Ingredients: 2 small Carrots
1 tsp. fresh Ginger
1 medium Orange
½ cup fresh Pineapple
½ Tsp. fresh Turmeric
8 oz. Unsweetened Almond or Coconut Milk
5 Ice Cubes

Instructions:  Place all ingredients into a high-speed blender and blend on high until creamy, smooth and delicious!

Kiwi and Spinach Smoothie  
 
Ingredients:  ½ frozen Banana
2 Kiwis
1 cup of Baby Spinach
1 cup of unsweetened Vanilla Almond Milk
1 tsp. Chia Seeds
3 Ice Cubes

Instructions:  Place all ingredients into a high-speed blender and blend on high until creamy, smooth and delicious!

Green Apple Ginger Smoothie   
 
Ingredients:  1.5 cups Kale
1 Granny Smith Apple
1 Orange
½ frozen Banana
1 tsp. minced Ginger
½ tsp. ground Cinnamon
1 tsp. Chia Seeds
3 Ice Cubes

Instructions:  Place all ingredients into a high-speed blender and blend on high until creamy, smooth and delicious!

I urge you to increase your nutrient intake today! I also urge you to stroll and support your local farmer’s markets.  Healthy eating is easy, fun, delicious and nutritious!

What is your favorite smoothie combo?

Joy Vale
Patient Care Coordinator
July 25, 2018

Functional Endocrinology of Ohio
Akron: 2800 S. Arlington Road, Akron, Ohio 44312 (330) 644-5488
Cleveland: 6200 Rockside Woods Blvd., Ste. 100, Independence, Ohio 44131 (216) 236-0060
Dr. Keith S. Ungar, Dr. Jessica Eckman, Chiropractic Physicians

To schedule an appointment, click here.

3 Easy Ways to Get Fit

Getting/staying in shape can seem like a race, and you may feel as if you keep coming in last. Well, Healthline released a newsletter talking about the top ways to burn fat.  Here are a few pointers to help you if you are trying but falling a little short of living a healthier life. One of these is right for you. Only about 20.6% of all people reach the suggested amount of exercise per day. (Approximately 150 minutes or 2 ½ hours) Excuses range from lack of time to lack of energy, so here are 3 easy tips to help get yourself fit and ahead in that race in no time.

1. Get some sleep!

Lack of sleep believe it or not can actually lead to weight gain. An article was written on https://www.healthline.com/health/sleep-deprivation/effects-on-body about the effects of sleep loss with one of the key points being weight gain. “With sleep deprivation, the chemicals that signal to your brain that you are full is off-balance.  As a result, you are more likely to over-indulge even when you’ve had enough to eat.” – Deborah Weatherspoon, Ph.D., RN, RNA.  Sleeping is crucial to a healthy life and preventing an unnecessary weight gain.  The National Sleep Foundation recommends that adults (18-64) should get 7-9 hours of sleep a night. Not achieving this amount can lead to sleep deprivation and in turn weight gain. If you have trouble achieving these hours of sleep nightly, try shut down earlier, meaning turn off electronics and let your mind decompress to get a full healthy nights rest.

2. Add a little Vinegar to your diet.

Now I know this one seems a little strange but adding as much as 1-2 tablespoons of vinegar to what you eat will bump up your fat burning rate, give you a smaller waist and lower belly fat. (which is all talked about by Rachel Link, MS, RD. on Healthline.com) Healthline advised eating as little as 1-2 tablespoons of vinegar. This, in turn, should reduce body fat in no more than 12 weeks! And if drinking vinegar out of the bottle doesn’t sound the tastiest to you, you aren’t alone, just try mixing it with a cup of water, other foods or even make homemade dressings.

3. Trade out those sugary drinks

Yes, this seems like a no-brainer but many people look past this small fact. Pop/kool-aid may taste nice, sugary and sweet but, it is causing a huge weight gain in the process. A study by Healthline showed that a group of people given water instead of pop or juice lost 4.4 lbs in 12 weeks! In one 12 oz can of pop, there are about 150 calories. That is 6% of your recommended daily calorie intake. That may not seem like a lot but if you compare it to a polar pop (about 2.6x bigger) it seems pretty excessive coming in at about 16% of your daily calorie intake (15.6% to be exact). Making simple changes such as pop for water or juice for green tea will help with weight issues and you will see results in no time at all.

And also, be sure to get plenty of exercise.  20 minutes a day will greatly increase your fat burning productivity. All these methods are effective but will work even better with exercise and a proper diet of 2,500 calories a day. Be sure to think of all these tips and more when going throughout your life.

Dallas Cain
July 18, 2018

Functional Endocrinology of Ohio
Akron: 2800 S. Arlington Road, Akron, Ohio 44312 (330) 644-5488
Cleveland: 6200 Rockside Woods Blvd., Ste. 100, Independence, Ohio 44131 (216) 236-0060
Dr. Keith S. Ungar, Dr. Jessica Eckman, Chiropractic Physicians

To schedule an appointment, click here.

www.healthline.com
www.HHS.gov
www.Livestrong.com
www.caloriecontrol.com

All That Screen Time is Affecting Your (And Your Children’s) Health!

It’s no secret that screen time affects our brains, but the blue light emitted from all types of screens particularly affects children & teens.  Blue light prevents the pineal gland, a pea-sized organ in the brain from releasing melatonin, the hormone responsible for reducing alertness and makes sleep more inviting.  Blue light also suppresses delta wavelength production in the brain, which induces sleep; As well as boosts alpha waves, which cause alertness.

You don’t have to stare directly at a screen for its rays to affect you: If enough blue light hits the eye, the gland can stop releasing melatonin. So, if your bedtime routine includes watching TV or taking your tablet or laptop to bed with you, this physically makes it harder to sleep, especially for sleep-deprived teenagers who are more vulnerable to the effects of light than adults.

“Teenagers have all the same risk of light exposure, but they are systematically sleep-deprived because of how society works against their natural clocks,” says sleep researcher Steven Lockley of Harvard Medical School. “Asking a teenager to get up at 7 a.m. is like asking me to get up at 4 a.m.”

A 2014 poll by the National Sleep Foundation found that more than half of 15-to-17-year-olds routinely get seven hours of sleep per night or less.  The recommended amount for teens is 8 ½ to 10 hours.  68% of these teens were also said to keep an electronic device on all night-a television, computer, video game or something similar.  It was also reported that sleep quality was better among children 6 to 17 who always turned their devices off: 45% of them were described as having excellent sleep quality vs. 25% of those who sometimes left devices on.

A study investigated by Figueiro found that when comparing melatonin levels of adults and teenagers looking at computer screens, she was astonished by the younger group’s light sensitivity.  Even when exposed to just one-tenth as much light as adults were, the teens actually suppressed more melatonin than older people.

Another study showed that teens who either excessively played video games or had intensive phone use were associated with poor perceived health, particularly when it negatively affected sleeping habits, which in turn was associated with increased waking-time tiredness.  Girls with intensive phone use were also found to have more musculoskeletal symptoms both directly and through deteriorated sleep.  A lack of sleep has been associated with ongoing depression, obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

Musculoskeletal problems due to tech use are also becoming more of a problem amongst children and teens.  “Text Neck” is a new term for chronic flexion and anterior head malposition.  When the head sits correctly above the body-with the ears over the shoulders with the shoulder blades pulled back-the head weighs approximately 10-12 lbs.  For every inch forward the head moves, the heavier it is and more stress it puts on the neck musculature and spinal cord.  

A study by the Surgical Technology International quantified this problem: As the head tilts forward 15 degrees from neutral, the forces on the cervical spine and supporting musculature increases to 27 lbs.  As the tilt increases, the forces increase to 40 lbs at 30 degrees, 49 lbs at 45 degrees and 60 lbs at 60 degrees.  This malposition also loads the discs in the spine-eccentrically loading the spine causes cracks in the discs, slipped or herniated discs.  This leads to stenosis or blockage of the spine, says Dr. Kenneth Hansraj, chief of spine surgery at New York Spine Surgery & Rehabilitation Medicine.  It can also cause pinched nerves, arthritis, bone spurs and muscular deformations.

To prevent developing tech-induced sleep deprivation and text-neck-shut the phones, TVs, computers, tablets, etc. off at least a half hour before bedtime.  Hold hand-held devices at eye level.  There are also apps available to warn you when your posture is not correct while on your device-The Text Neck Institute has developed the Text Neck Indicator, an interactive app that alerts users when their smartphones are held at an angle that puts them at risk for text neck.

Dr. Jessica Eckman, DC
July 4, 2018

Functional Endocrinology of Ohio
Akron: 2800 S. Arlington Road, Akron, Ohio 44312 (330) 644-5488
Cleveland: 6200 Rockside Woods Blvd., Ste. 100, Independence, Ohio 44131 (216) 236-0060
Dr. Keith S. Ungar, Dr. Jessica Eckman, Chiropractic Physicians

To schedule an appointment, click here.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/blue-light-from-electronics-disturbs-sleep-especially-for-teenagers/2014/08/29/3edd2726-27a7-11e4-958c-268a320a60ce_story.html
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S014019710600073X
http://www.latimes.com/health/la-he-text-neck-20150404-story.html