Health Problems Are Really an Energy Problem!

Everything in the Human Body Runs Off ENERGY

Or at least that’s the first thing to evaluate and fix before moving onto other health problems. The first thing in the body that gets burned into energy is sugar and carbs, followed by fats and then if we have to, proteins. After stating this I often hear people say: “Well I’m not diabetic so this can’t be my problem.” WRONG, you don’t have to be a full-blown diabetic to have energy problems.  Pre-diabetes, hypoglycemia, and issues with fat metabolism could all be issues.  Or, you are lacking the proper cofactors for energy metabolism or have a poor diet causing dysglycemia.  There could be several energy issues going on other than diabetes. Diabetes is just a diagnosis of a process that has been out of control for a while. Of course, it’s one of the biggest energy problems and if you have it you probably already are having other health problems and complications. In which case you need to watch our diabetes video. Regardless, if there is an energy problem, in the body it can lead to other problems and here are a few examples.

Hormone Problems

Guess what?  Insulin, your major blood sugar regulator, is a hormone! Hormones are chemical messengers the body produces in the body that make physiological changes. Hormones are the slower messenger system in the body and your nervous system is the fast messenger system in the body. Your endocrine system is the network of glands that produce your hormones and there is a feedback loop that goes back up to the brain to regulate your endocrine system. Whereas healthcare has separated this into each gland with specialist doctors, the endocrine system is actually a connected system of all the hormone-producing glands, your nervous system, and your immune system as well. This vast interconnected system is your neuroendocrine-immune system.  The operation of the neuroendocrine system requires a lot of energy.   Insulin causes other hormones to work and be produced. Do you think your body is going to think about reproduction if it doesn’t have the energy available to do that? You need energy before your body can send the message to do something.

Brain Problems

The brain, nicknamed the greedy master, uses roughly about 25 percent of all the energy we take in. So it is in constant need of energy. Not just that, it is reliant on the body to supply it with glucose for energy because neurons cannot store its own source of energy. Therefore any dip or spike in your blood glucose levels is toxic to the brain. To top it off any surges or crashes in your insulin affect the pathways for your serotonin and dopamine production. Perhaps you have noticed this after a lunch rich in sugars while attempting to be productive at work during the afternoon.

 Sleep Problems

Even when you are sleeping, your body needs a supply of energy.  Cortisol controls your sleep-wake cycle or circadian rhythm.   Cortisol is a glucocorticoid hormone (Gluco meaning glucose/sugar and corticoid meaning produced by the adrenal glands). Your cortisol levels should be low at night and high in the morning. The reason for this is because at night you need stable blood sugars because you will not need as much energy while you sleep. However, when you wake up, your blood sugars are lower because you are not eating while you sleep and you need a burst of energy to get up, so your cortisol levels elevate.  Therefore, a dysregulated energy system is a dysregulated sleep system!

Get your energy levels in check and get your health in check.

Dr. David R.A. Hardy, D.C.,
November 29, 2017

Functional Endocrinology of Ohio
Akron: 2800 S. Arlington Road, Akron, Ohio 44312 (330) 644-5488
Cleveland: 6200 Rockside Woods Blvd., Ste. 100, Independence, Ohio 44131 (216) 236-0060
Dr. Keith S. Ungar, Dr. David Hardy, Dr. Joseph Little, Chiropractic Physicians

To schedule an appointment, click here.

 

Ease Anxiety, Depression and Addiction Holistically Through Restorative Yoga Poses

Just a few moments spent in stillness and silence will promote calmness and clarity!

Restorative yoga provides healing for the mind and body. A restorative practice offers the opportunity, with its long-held poses, to sit with our negative experiences and breathe through the emotionally turbulent times and negative thought patterns.   Restorative yoga promotes a physical and mental balance to prevent stress and anxiety or simply calm your mind to help regain a healthy focus. It also allows you to explore what happens when you release the tension your body habitually holds.  These yoga sequences typically involve 5 or 6 poses, held for lengths of time that allow you to completely relax and rest.  Held for at least 5 minutes or more, the physical postures, breathing techniques, and meditation or relaxation can positively improve your quality of life.

The top 10 Benefits of Restorative Yoga:

  1. Stress relief
  2. Lowers anxiety
  3. Releases tension
  4. Increases Brain Function
  5. Stimulates Self-Healing
  6. Lowers Heart Rate
  7. Alleviates Depression
  8. Improves sleep
  9. Increases Energy
  10. Awakens Peace

Below are 6 of my favorite restorative poses:

Easy Pose: This pose is a great way to start.  Position yourself on your mat.  Cross your shins and widen your knees.  Sit up tall lengthening your spine.  Close your eyes and gently rest your hands on your knees.  Take 3 deep breathes in and out to the count of 3. The key is to focus on your breath to help your mind begin to relax. Continue to breathe deep cleansing breaths. Breathe deeply in through the nose as if you are smelling a beautiful rose.  Hold at the top for 4-8 seconds and release by breathing out through the nose as if you’re fogging up a mirror. The easy pose promotes an inner calm and also allows you to focus on your breath and the present moment.

Childs Pose: Begin by folding your legs under you, touching your big toes together and sit on back your heels, reach your hands forward as you lay your chest on or between your thighs.  Separate your knees as wide as your hips.  Continue reaching forward to feel the added stretch of your spine.  Take 5 deep, calming breaths.  Childs pose allows you to relax your neck, shoulders, and spine all at once.
Legs up the wall: Set yourself up with a comfortable space. Place the end of your mat directly in touch with the wall. Begin by shimming your hips a few inches from the wall then start walking your feet up the wall until your body is in a slight  L-shaped position.  Make any adjustments needed to make yourself comfortable and relaxed.  Maybe place a pillow under your head or let your arms rest out to the sides or on your belly.  At this point, you will begin to focus on your breathing.  Take a deep, slow inhale through your nose, hold at the top, and then a deep, slow exhale out the nose.  Relax for at least 5-15 minutes. This pose allows the mind and body to relax, relieving stress and tension. The semi-supine aspect of the pose combined with invigorating breaths leads to a slowing down within your body and elicits a relaxation response by lowering your heart rate.

Bridge Pose: While lying on your back, bend both knees and place the feet flat on the floor hip-width apart.  Slide your arms alongside the body with palms facing down.  Your fingertips should be lightly touching the heels.  Press the feet into the floor, inhale and lift the hips up rolling the spine off of the floor.  Gently, squeeze the knees together keeping them hip-width apart.  Press down into the arms and shoulders to lift up the chest. Maybe draw your hands together interlocking the fingers.  Engage the legs and buttocks to lift the hips higher.  Take a deep, invigorating breath, in through the nose as if you are smelling a beautiful flower, hold at the top and then breathe out through the nose as if to fog up a mirror as you gently release and slowly roll the spine back to the floor.  This pose lengthens and strengthens the spine stimulating the endocrine and nervous system.

Cat/Cow Pose: Start on your mat in a tabletop position, neutral spine, with shoulders over the wrists and hips over the knees.  Fingers will point forward and the tops of the feet resting on the floor shoelace side down.  Take a big deep inhale.  On the exhale, round up your spine towards the ceiling pulling the belly button to the spine.  Tuck the chin towards your chest releasing the neck.  This is the cat-like shape.  On your exhale, arch your back and let the belly relax.  Lift your head and tailbone towards the sky. Be careful not to put too much tension on the neck. This is the cow part of the pose.  Begin to flow with the breath between these two poses, inhaling for cow pose and exhaling for cat pose. Repeat for at least 10 rounds.  This pose will relieve back and neck tension.
Savasana: Although it may seem the easiest pose it often is the most difficult.  The art of relaxation is harder than it looks!  Savasana is the practice of gradually relaxing one body part at a time, on muscle at a time, and one thought at a time.  Rest your entire body on your mat.  Extend your arms and legs outward from the torso evenly and symmetrically.  Take a mental scan of your body from head to toe releasing any tension in each body part from your eyes to your jaw to your shoulders, knees, and toes.  Let your body grow heavier with each exhalation.  The goal is to relax with attention, to stay conscious and alert while being at ease.  Just breathe.  This pose, practiced regularly, conditions the body to release stress and improve your sense of physical and emotional well-being.
Yoga has become increasingly popular in today’s busy society providing a retreat from the chaos and busyness and everyday stressors.   It is important to find healthy coping skills that will work for you. Yoga offers peace and tranquility and can ease the symptoms of anxiety, depression and addictive behaviors. Devoting time to your mat allows you the time to relax and calm your thoughts, focus on living in the moment, and take care of you in a healthy, holistic way.  Yoga works with the nature of the mind, the nature of being a human, how emotions live in our bodies, how they affect our behavior and our minds.  I urge you to try a new approach. Relax and Rejuvenate.  Find what works for you!
Namaste.  The light in me honors the light in you,

Joy Vale
Patient Care Coordinator
November 22, 2017

Functional Endocrinology of Ohio
Akron: 2800 S. Arlington Road, Akron, Ohio 44312 (330) 644-5488
Cleveland: 6200 Rockside Woods Blvd., Ste. 100, Independence, Ohio 44131 (216) 236-0060
Dr. Keith S. Ungar, Dr. David Hardy, Dr. Joseph Little, Chiropractic Physicians

To schedule an appointment, click here.

What Are the Health Benefits of Restorative Yoga?” Power Yoga, 31 May 2017, poweryoga.com/blog/health-benefits-restorative-yoga/.
“10 Best Yoga Poses to Grow Taller.” BeautyGlimpse, 10 May 2014, http://www.beautyglimpse.com/10-best-yoga-poses-grow-taller/.
Orenstein, Beth W. “8 Yoga Poses for Beginners.” EverydayHealth.com, 26 Mar. 2013, www.everydayhealth.com/fitness-pictures/yoga-poses-for-beginners.aspx.
“Legs-up-the-Wall Pose.” Inspiredhealthcoach.wordpress.com, 3 Mar. 2011, inspiredhealthcoach.wordpress.com/2011/03/03/trouble-sleeping/legs-up-the-wall-pose/.
Paul, Jasmina. “The Yoga Bridge Pose: 5 Seldom-Known Benefits.” Ayurveda Natural Anti-Aging, Mind, Body Health, 14 June 2015, www.bodhyhealth.com/blog/2015/04/yoga-bridge-pose-benefits/.
Sulpizio, Lorri. “Benefits of the Cat-Cow Pose.” Team Better, blog.teambetter.com/benefits-of-the-cat-cow-pose/.

Challenge Yourself to Get More Exercise – 4 Great Tools to Help.

Beep… beep… beep… 

You reluctantly muster enough energy to silence your alarm clock for the third time this morning. By the time the fourth alarm goes off, you’ve had enough. There won’t be a fifth! And inevitably that early morning gym trip that once sounded so exciting and invigorating the night before has once again faded from becoming reality. Oh well, you think, maybe tomorrow I’ll finally make it to the gym this week. Or at the very least a morning jog or something. Hold that thought – its way, way, way too cold for that outside this time of year. Pretty sure that would result in me freezing to death. No, definitely not. This is how it goes for a lot of us, myself included. We make excuses for not having enough time or find abstract ways to rationalize why we can’t fit exercise into our busy schedules.

The following is a list of helpful apps to help empower people with tools to incorporate exercise into their lives.

Up 

The Up app connects to your tracker or your smartphone’s built-in sensors to help you track and interpret a variety of metrics such as steps taken, calories burned and activity intensity. It also allows for manual entry of food and drinks tracking, as well as sleep quantity.

Lose It!

Lose It! aims to help users set and meet exercise, nutrition, and other wellness goals. Users start by logging food and exercise, using the Lose It! calorie counter, along with the recipe builder and exercise planner, to stay within their daily calorie budget. Users can join existing peer support groups or challenges, which run the gamut from eating more vegetables to logging more exercise. While the app uses the phone’s built-in pedometer for step tracking, Lose It! also integrates with several health and fitness platforms, including Fitbit, MapMyFitness, Nike+ and Strava.

FitStar

FitStar functions as your personalized digital training coach, adapting its exercise routines to match your physical ability, carefully calibrating workouts to be challenging without being too difficult. Users can configure their ideal exercise duration and workout goals, and the app will whip up a workout session for you. Once done, you can rate the difficulty of the workout, allowing the app to slowly learn and adapt to your workout capacity, challenging you without breaking your body.

Fitbit

At this point, most of us have heard of this one. The Fitbit app works with the Fitbit wearable activity tracker, but it’s also turned into a solid standalone fitness tracker app. In addition to syncing with Fitbit’s line of exercise trackers, the app can also use your smartphone’s sensors as a pedometer to record your steps taken daily, use GPS to track walking and running routes. The app also includes a food log for tracking nutrition, with a bar code scanner or a caloric estimator. Social features such as leaderboard and challenges round out the features.

So find your favorite tool and challenge yourself!

Dr. Joseph Little, D.C.
November 15, 2017

Functional Endocrinology of Ohio
Akron: 2800 S. Arlington Road, Akron, Ohio 44312 (330) 644-5488
Cleveland: 6200 Rockside Woods Blvd., Ste. 100, Independence, Ohio 44131 (216) 236-0060
Dr. Keith S. Ungar, Dr. David Hardy, Dr. Joseph Little, Chiropractic Physicians

To schedule an appointment, click here.

Are you a Podcast Person? The Who, What, When, Why and How on Podcasts

You Too Can Be Podcast Person!

The Who, The Why and The When

If you have a smartphone or a computer then it’s very easy to join the podcast world. Podcasts appeal to me because I can tailor them to my interests with minimal effort and cost. With commuting between offices, 2 days a week I’m in the care for at least 90 minutes each day. As much as I enjoy music I decided to use that time more wisely. So I make phone calls, listen to audio books and lately I’ve really gotten into all different podcasts. On the days with the shorter commute, I’m listening to my music.

I don’t think I even knew what a podcast was in 2016.  I subscribe to many and really enjoy the wide variety of topics to pick from. I also listen to a podcast as I’m falling asleep 90% of the time I fall asleep within 15 minutes. Before I started my mind would go all over the place and take me longer. I listen to a podcast that I know is going to make me happy and something that I know will set my dreams in motion. Last night, I listened to Feherty and he was interviewing Justin Thomas. Which put my golfing dreams in motion, I got my first hole in one. I set the sleep timer to 30 minutes which means I usually need to go back and listen to what I missed the next night. The podcasts that I know I’m going to need to pay close attention or that I know will keep me awake I listen to in the car. Here’s how I got started, someone told me about a podcast called Road Trippin “, It’s a couple of players that started it from the Cleveland Cavs, I learned so much more about the team and all the players and they are very funny and always kept me laughing. After that, I was hooked and started to do some research. Here are my top podcasts that I enjoy.

The What

Good Life Project

 In his weekly podcast, author and entrepreneur Jonathan Fields picks big topics like meaning, happiness, purpose, creativity, confidence, and success. Fields’ curiosity means he gives his guests (who range from Brené Brown and Seth Godin to everyday people) space and time to dive deep.

The Slow Home Podcast

 So many of us are too busy, too stressed and too tired. Brooke McAlary’s podcast is the perfect antidote. She explores what can help us live a slower and simpler life, such as developing rituals for gratitude and single-tasking, meditation, screen-free bedrooms and frugal hedonism (yes, it’s a thing).

Straight and Curly

 It might sound a bit Oprah-esque, but if you’re looking to improve yourself and live your best life, then Carly Jacobs and Kelly Exeter’s podcast is for you. Jacobs and Exeter are self-improvement junkies who discuss the side effects of living a hectic life and offer tips, advice, and strategies to get your calm on. They present a personable, funny podcast with heaps of life hacks – a fresh one each week – from learning to say no to being more decisive.

Optimal Living Daily

While it has a plain title, Justin Malik’s daily podcast is anything but ordinary. A digest of what he calls the internet’s best content, Malik narrates blog posts (with permission from their authors) which mainly look at personal development, minimalism, and productivity. It could be a recipe for dullness, but Malik has skills.  He curates compelling and challenging episodes. With each coming in at around 10 minutes, OLD is a bite-sized summary of what’s now great on the web.

Crime waves: six gripping stories By Tim Walker

The true crime story it tells is both more concise and more conclusive than its podcast predecessor.

The Daily

Twenty minutes a day, Monday to Friday of every week, dropping shortly before 6 a.m., The New York Times‘s Michael Barbaro covers the essentials of “what you need to know today”. It’s a reassuringly consistent way to feel like you’re at least keeping moderately on top of things, and the show offers an inside track on scoops like Emily Steele’s Bill O’Reilly exposé, or Maggie Haberman and Glenn Thrush’s consistently revelatory White House reporting.

The How

  • Ask your friends what they’re listening to.
  • Search by topic to find the podcast that suits your interests.
  • You can subscribe to podcasts via platforms such as iTunes, Stitcher, SoundCloud, and PodBean.

Not sure how to listen to a podcast? Ask a “techy” family member or friend to help.  It’s easy!

Nancy Boardman
November 8, 2017

Functional Endocrinology of Ohio
Akron: 2800 S. Arlington Road, Akron, Ohio 44312 (330) 644-5488
Cleveland: 6200 Rockside Woods Blvd., Ste. 100, Independence, Ohio 44131 (216) 236-0060
Dr. Keith S. Ungar, Dr. David Hardy, Dr. Joseph Little, Chiropractic Physicians
http://www.balancingyourchemistry.com

To schedule an appointment, click here.

If Your Brain Was a Restaurant

The Primitive Reptilian Brain – The Back of the Restaurant

In every restaurant, the entire operation is completely and undeniably reliant on the back of the restaurant. This area is your prep area, your dishwasher, your equipment and your supply storage, fridge and freezer. No one ever walks into a restaurant and says I bet I’m having a great dining experience because everything is running smoothly in the back.

However, if this area of the restaurant was in chaos there is no way the rest of the place could function smoothly or efficiently. Well, unfortunately, this is how society and healthcare have looked at the brain. It has completely ignored the primitive brain. The primitive brain is the area of the brain that controls all your vital function (heart rate, blood pressure, respiration, digestion, etc.) It is the area that times and coördinates thoughts and movements, the areas that tell you where you are in your environment, the areas that keep you from falling, and the areas that keep you alert.  This area and the vast number of functions is the place where we are constantly seeing health problems. Let’s be completely honest; if these areas don’t function well, the rest of the brain gets frustrated! It would be analogous to an angry chef like we’ve all seen on the TV shows. They would be yelling and screaming; hey get me clean pans; slice those mushrooms and those d*** radishes. Primitive functions need to happen in order for advanced functions to happen.

The Limbic brain – The Front of the Restaurant

The front of the restaurant is the experience!  “Oh, she was such a nice person.   Oh, she brought everything out on time!”   This is like the limbic part of our brain.  And, just like the front of the restaurant gets grief from the back of the restaurant, our emotional/limbic lobes are constantly being bombarded from our primitive brain. For example, how do you feel if you are dizzy or disoriented? How do you feel when your heart is pounding through your chest? How do you feel when you can’t get a deep breath? How do you feel when a million things are being thrown at you? Over-stimulate you? Do you ever feel so defeated from this that you want to act like the waitress that tells the dishwasher to take a hike as she storms off out the back door and behind the dumpster for a big deep drag of her cigarette with shaking hands? Wow! I’m so sorry; I don’t know why I’m so emotional. 😊

The Cortex – The Chef   

The part of the restaurant that gets all the headlines and the area of the brain that gets all the attention is the cortex. However, the purpose of the chef area of the brain (the cortex) is to herd cats; even more so than being creative or intelligent. It is trying to tell the emotional areas to chill out; it is directing and attempting to make sense out of all the nonsense being thrown at it from other parts of the brain. If these other areas aren’t doing their basic job, it screams at them and tries to organize this complete chaos. Eventually, though, there is only so much screaming ones’ head can do! Then it will begin to slow down and shut down for moments at a time, Then, these moments happen more often, until the cortex completely fails and/or the restaurant closes.  “Oh, why can’t I think clearly anymore and nothing makes sense with all this noise!”

So, now you know – the best restaurants need a great back of the house, a front of the house, and a chef to keep it all in order.  Your brain needs the same thing – a healthy primitive brain, limbic brain and cortex for the body to work at its best.  So many of us ignore the signs of a brain function imbalance and/or do not have any idea what to do about it.  That is where a functional neurologist can help.  Click here to learn more about functional neurology.

Dr. David R.A. Hardy, DC, DACNB, FABBIR
October 31, 2017

Functional Endocrinology of Ohio
Akron: 2800 S. Arlington Road, Akron, Ohio 44312 (330) 644-5488
Cleveland: 6200 Rockside Woods Blvd., Ste. 100, Independence, Ohio 44131 (216) 236-0060
Dr. Keith S. Ungar, Dr. David Hardy, Dr. Joseph Little, Chiropractic Physicians

To schedule an appointment, click here.