5 Tips for Pow-Wow Happiness

5 TIPS FOR POW WOW HAPPINESS | Functional Endocrinology of Ohio

Get busy being happy, or get out of the way.

I recently attended an Indian Pow Wow and while browsing through the arts and crafts I came across a burden basket, which is a combination of a dream catcher and a basket intertwined with decorations of different colored beads and a variety of feathers.   The Cherokee people believe you should not bring your burdens into their homes and while you are a guest you are at ease and carefree.  The basket hangs on the front door and your guest would symbolically place their burdens aside and enjoy the warm spirit that their host had to offer while visiting with them.   It is small reminders that help set the tone for me sometimes and I hope by sharing this short story it will do the same for you.

People study the science of happiness and share it in a variety of blogs and studies published on the Internet.  Trained professionals like psychologists and life coaches dedicate their lives to making people achieve a greater state of happiness.  The brain is an amazing organ that can bring us great joy and laughter into our lives or also create great sorrow and tears.  The universal hope is that we can all achieve a greater state of inner peace and we all have our own quirky little ways of doing so.  I have outlined 5 basic reminders of things to help with putting your mind and body at ease as another constant reminder that we were designed to be happy.

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20 Ideas For The Best Fall Ever!

20 Ideas For The Best Fall Ever by Real Wellness Doc

Fall Family Fun

Everyone knows that I am a summer lover.  I love the sunshine and the heat.  I love beaches and swimming and wearing flip-flops.  But, autumn is in the air.  The leaves are changing colors, the days are getting shorter and the air is getting cooler.  Snow will be here before we know it.

When the weather gets colder, we find ourselves in the house much more.  We sit and watch TV.  We snuggle on the couch.  We don’t go outside and exercise.  We get a little lazy and a little depressed.  But I have decided that I am not going to let that happen this Fall.  I am going to enjoy the change of seasons.  So, I came up with some fun activities I am going to do.  Here are some of my ideas:

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Your Gut is Like a Smelly Drain? What Ordinary Things Can Tell You About Your Gut Health.

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The gut is the most ignored system in health-care! It is a source for all sorts of health ailments. For example depression, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, multiple sclerosis, autoimmune disease, fatigue, and migraine, just to name a few. Your gut houses about 90 percent of your immune system so, of course, it’s the area that needs the most protection. Think about all those microorganisms that we consume with food. When things go bad with the gut, it doesn’t always translate into pain. Bloated StomachBecause our health care system focuses on symptoms, gut health is often ignored.  Even when the gut is a focus, your doctor is most likely going to give you something to mask the symptoms instead of fixing the cause of the gut dysfunction.

Let’s use the analogy of the plumbing in your body being like the plumbing in your house. Just like the plumbing in your house, sometimes things do not flow right, rot or backing up. The same is true with your human plumbing.  Here are a few examples of  the traditional health care approach to gut dysfunction.

Continue reading Your Gut is Like a Smelly Drain? What Ordinary Things Can Tell You About Your Gut Health.

Concussions: A Mom’s Perspective

It’s official, the 2017 High School Football Season has begun!  Watching my Son play football under the Friday night lights is one of my favorite things to do this time of year. His commitment, his dedication, and his hard work are paying off. Involving our children in sports has always been a priority in our family.    The commitment provides an opportunity to gain greater self-awareness, develop better social skills and commit to a consistent exercise regimen. Becoming actively involved in a sport provides a wealth of health benefits.  Playing a sport can improve efficient functioning of the heart, improve blood circulation, lower hypertension, and lower stress levels. Being part of a team also teaches so many valuable life lessons such as commitment, comradery and mental and physical toughness.  We can do great things when we keep up our physical and mental well-being!

  Although I enjoy watching my son progress and excel at his favorite sport, the sport itself is downright dangerous.  I worry about the next practice, the next play, the next hit or even the after effects of it all.  Last season, I received the call that my son, during practice, took a very hard hit to the head.  It was the second week of football practice and already my son had been hit so hard that he suffered a loss of consciousness, confusion, blurred vision, and a constant headache that would not ease up.   Although there were very real signs and symptoms of a concussion in my son’s case, that may not always be the case.  Often times, the signs and symptoms are subtle and are not always apparent immediately.   Concussions can happen in an instant. Yet they can have a lasting impact on a young athlete.  It is Important to know the warning signs and follow through with a treatment plan to reduce long-term effects. Your brain can heal itself.  However, just because your athlete may feel better doesn’t mean that the brain is healed.  According to Dr. David Hardy, Chiropractic Neurologist at Functional Endocrinology of Ohio, the brain takes time to heal.  Often times the brain compensates during the process and if not properly diagnosed and treated may lead to a more severe concussion to follow often resulting in worse damage than the first.

Be aware of the signs:

  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Sensitivity to light and sound
  • Headaches
  • Blurred vision
  • Dizziness or confusion
  • Trouble thinking or remembering
  • Speech problems
  • Feeling sleepy or a change in sleep pattern
  • Loss of consciousness (This doesn’t always have to happen)

Know what to do:

  • Seek medical attention, get checked out to assess the extent of the concussion. Become as involved as possible in the care and management plan to help prevent or lessen the long-term effects or injury.
  • Rest
  • Maintain a healthy diet
  • Seek neuro-rehabilitation. A trained functional neurologist is the best.
  • Keep open communication with your player. Make sure they know how important it is to communicate all symptoms

We are very fortunate to play for a high school program that provides our players with state of the art equipment and a professionally trained staff.  At the start of the season, players were all given base line testing or a preseason physical of the brain which records the normal neurological state.  In Sam’s case, the high school athletic department, trainer and coaching staff followed the proper protocol.  I know that I can’t shelter or protect my son but I will make sure to be equipped to recognize the signs and symptoms and know what to do in the case of an unfortunate head trauma or even a hard hit.

The most important way to equip your player is to encourage that they do not hide their symptoms.  Make sure that they know to report their symptoms to the high school trainer, coaching staff and parents.  Make sure that your player is always wearing protective gear.  If signs or symptoms are present, get checked out.  Whenever there is doubt, encourage them to sit out.

I feel very fortunate to work for a team of doctors committed to overall health and well-being.  This year, Dr. David Hardy, DC, DACNB, FABBIR joined our team at Functional Endocrinology of Ohio with an extensive background in Functional Neurology.  As an athlete himself, who competed in competitive rugby, high school football, and basketball, as well as Ironman competitions, his passion is treating all brain-related conditions but especially TBIs and concussions.  Even though I will always worry about that next practice, next hit, next play or even the after effects of it all, my doctors have educated my son and me about the proper protocols.  Because of this knowledge and guidance, I will know what to look for and how to aid in the recovery process.

When it comes to concussions, be aware and use your head!

Joy Vale
Patient Care Coordinator
September 6, 2017

Functional Endocrinology of Ohio

Akron: 2800 S. Arlington Road, Akron, Ohio 44312 (330) 644-5488
Cleveland: 6200 Rockside Woods Blvd., Ste. 100, Independence, Ohio 44131 (216) 236-0060
Dr. Keith S. Ungar, Dr. Andrew Kender, Dr. David Hardy, Dr. Joseph Little, Chiropractic Physicians

To schedule an appointment, click here.