Did You Know that Neuropathy Can Actually Be Reversed?

neuropathy

When we hear the word neuropathy we automatically think of it being some type of nervous system issue. The definition of neuropathy is, “Damage to or disease affecting the nerves.” A good question to ask yourself is, “How do these nerves become damaged or start to die off?” Neuropathy is really a vascular issue because the arteries around the nerves start to lose their blood supply causing the nerves to shrivel once the blood vessels disappear due to a lack of oxygen. Neuropathy covers a wide area and can be termed mononeuropathy meaning it affects only one nerve or polyneuropathy meaning it affects several nerves. Peripheral neuropathy is also common meaning it affects the peripheral nervous system including the hands and feet. Three different nerve types including sensory nerves, motor nerves, and autonomic nerves can be disrupted when experiencing neuropathy. The sensory nerves control the sensation pathway from your extremities to your brain. A patient with neuropathy would experience symptoms like tingling, burning, pain, and numbness. The motor pathway controls a person’s ability to move and generate power. If you were experiencing motor issues you would have trouble with balance and feel weakness, heaviness, or cramping in your hands and feet. The last pathway, the autonomic nerves, control gut and bladder control. When these nerves aren’t firing it can cause changes in heart rate, blood pressure, and sweating.

Another common misconception that often occurs when patients hear the word neuropathy is that it only occurs due to Diabetes. However, this statement is only partially correct. Only thirty percent of all neuropathy diagnoses are linked to diabetes. Patients who are diabetic or pre-diabetic are more at risk for amputation, though. Approximately 86,000 diabetics every year lose an extremity as a complication from their neuropathy. So, where does the other seventy percent of cases come from? Neuropathy is a progressive disease on its own. It can also be linked to poor circulation, spinal stenosis, chemotherapy, medications, infections, alcohol abuse, and autoimmune diseases, among other causes.

Most medical doctors or neurologists will prescribe a drug to help relieve a patient of their symptoms. It is your duty to understand that the drug prescribed is only going to mask the symptoms while the real condition itself becomes progressively worse. Treatments such as low-level laser therapy, infrared, and nerve stimulation therapy are designed to regenerate cell growth, decrease swelling, decrease pain, promote angiogenesis, and increase the healing time of chronic wounds. This is how neuropathy can be treated and controlled and there are over two thousand research articles to prove it!

Kristy Narsinghani
December 21, 2016

Functional Endocrinology of Ohio
Akron: 2800 S. Arlington Road, Akron, Ohio 44312 (330) 644-5488
Cleveland: 6200 Rockside Woods Blvd., Ste. 100, Independence, Ohio 44131 (216) 236-0060
Dr. Keith S. Ungar, Dr. Andrew Kender, Dr. Robert Nichols, Chiropractic Physicians

To schedule an appointment, click here.

 

7 Healthy Recipes to Help You through the Hustle and Bustle

christmas-2016

Merry Christmas From

Functional Endocrinology of Ohio

Love the Holiday Season but don’t want to sabotage your healthy lifestyle? Below are sure ways to stay on track, not run out of steam during the hustle and bustle of it all, and still enjoy the time with your loved ones.

The key to maintaining a healthy lifestyle is to always plan. I like to use my Sunday mornings to plan my meals for the week.  Being prepared takes the stress out of it all and ensures that I make good decisions throughout the week. Make sure to start the day out with a well-balanced breakfast. Enjoy veggies and proteins first. Be sure to include at least 2 different fruits and 2 different veggies per day.  Also, be sure to drink plenty of water to hydrate throughout the day. Always have a small snack on hand to tide you over until the next mealtime.  I like to cut up fresh veggies for on the go and I never leave home without a bag full of almonds.

Below are 7 healthy recipes that are personal favorites of mine.  I hope you enjoy!

BLUEBERRY TURKEY BREAKFAST SAUSAGE

Ingredients

1 lb ground turkey
1 tsp kosher salt
½ tsp ground black pepper
½ tsp garlic powder
1 tsp dried rosemary, roughly chopped
½ tsp dried thyme
½ tsp ground nutmeg
1 tbsp. maple syrup
½ cup fresh blueberries
1 tbsp. olive oil or avocado oil

Instructions

In a large bowl, combine ground turkey, salt, pepper, garlic powder, rosemary, thyme, and nutmeg and mix until the spices are even dispersed throughout the turkey. Then stir in the maple syrup and blueberries carefully so you do not break any of the blueberries.

Form into 8 to 10 patties.

Preheat a large skillet over medium-high heat with the tablespoon of oil.

Place patties in the skillet in two batches, cooking for about 3-5 minutes on each side, until the patties are browned on each side, the center is cooked through and reaches an internal temperature of 165F.

HUMMUS CHICKEN SALAD

Ingredients
(Makes 4 cups)

1 (15 oz) can chickpeas, rinsed & drained
3 TBSP water
3-4 TBSP lemon juice
3 TBSP olive oil
1 clove garlic {about 1 tsp minced}
½ tsp salt
½ tsp paprika
¼ tsp cayenne pepper
3 cups (12 oz.) cooked chicken, shredded
¼ cup grated onion {about ¼ medium onion}
½ cup diced bell pepper {about ½ bell pepper}
½ cup diced celery {about 2 stalks}

Instructions

Add chickpeas, water, lemon juice, olive oil, garlic, salt, paprika, and cayenne pepper to a bowl of a food processor. Process until completely smooth.

Transfer to a bowl and stir in shredded chicken and grated onion {along with any juices from onion}. Stir until completely combined. Add in diced bell pepper and celery. Taste and season with more lemon juice, salt, paprika, and/or cayenne pepper as needed.

EASY SPICED HOT FRUIT BAKE

Ingredients

2 cup sliced apples
2 cups green pear slices
1 1/2 cup fresh cranberries
1 cup pineapple chunks (save the juice)
lemon juice
1/3 cup coconut sugar
1 tbsp agave or honey
1 tsp cinnamon
1/4 tsp nutmeg
1/2 stick melted butter or 4 tbsp melted earth balance vegan butter
2 tbsp melted coconut oil (this is optional but does give it more flavor and coating. Add 1 tbsp butter instead if you don’t have coconut oil).
1/3 cup chopped walnuts

Instructions

Preheat oven to 300F.

In a large bowl, toss your fruit and add in 1-2 tsp lemon juice. Set aside.

In another glass bowl, combine your melted butter, sugar, spices, and coconut oil.

Add in honey and a little bit of your leftover pineapple juice as well.

Add this sugar/butter mixture to your fruit and coat evenly.

Pour fruit evenly in a 9×12 baking dish.

Pour the leftover sugar/butter/oil mixture on top.

Baking for 1 hr.

Add your nuts last.

Mix fruit again and serve.

You can also add your nuts in the last 30 minutes of the baking time if you prefer them hot and baked as well

BUFFALO CHICKEN DIP

Ingredients

3 cups cooked chicken, shredded (I used leftover rotisserie chicken)
1 cup mayonnaise (homemade or Primal Kitchen /Sir Kensington )
½ cup hot sauce (I used Tessemae’s but Frank’s Original works too)

1 teaspoon garlic powder

½ teaspoon onion powder

¾ teaspoon sea salt

¼ teaspoon black pepper

Instructions

Preheat your oven to 350 degrees. Combine all the ingredients in a medium-sized bowl and stir well.

Pour the mixture into an 8×8” dish, or a round dish like the one that I used in the photos.

Bake uncovered for 30-35 minutes, or until the edges are lightly brown and bubbling.

Enjoy warm with celery, carrot and zucchini sticks! Plantain chips are awesome too!

CHICKEN AND ASPARAGUS LEMON STIR-FRY

Ingredients 

1 1/2 pounds skinless chicken breast, cut into 1-inch cubes
Kosher salt, to taste
1/2 cup reduced-sodium chicken broth
2 tablespoons Tamari
2 teaspoons cornstarch
2 tablespoons water
1 tbsp canola or grapeseed oil, divided
1 bunch asparagus, ends trimmed, cut into 2-inch pieces
6 cloves garlic, chopped
1 tbsp fresh ginger
3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice

Instructions

Lightly season the chicken with salt. In a small bowl, combine chicken broth and soy sauce. In a second small bowl combine the cornstarch and water and mix well to combine.

Heat a large non-stick wok over medium-high heat, when hot add 1 teaspoon of the oil, then add the asparagus and cook until tender-crisp, about 3 to 4 minutes.  Add the garlic and ginger and cook until golden, about 1 minute. Set aside.

Increase the heat to high, then add 1 teaspoon of oil and half of the chicken and cook until browned and cooked through, about 4 minutes on each side. Remove and set aside and repeat with the remaining oil and chicken. Set aside.

Add the soy sauce mixture; bring to a boil and cook about 1-1/2 minutes. Add lemon juice and cornstarch mixture and stir well, when it simmers return the chicken and asparagus to the wok and mix well, remove from heat and serve.

DAIRY-FREE EGGNOG

Ingredients

1 cup unsweetened almond milk
1/8 cup coconut milk (I use canned full fat)
1 frozen banana (cut in chunks)
1 teaspoon cinnamon (I like Ceylon Cinnamon)
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
cloves pinch (optional)
1 tablespoon maple syrup (optional depending on your sweetness level)
Splash of rum

Instructions

Place all ingredients in a blender and blend for a few minutes until completely combined and a little foamy and frothy.

Garnish with sprinkled cinnamon or nutmeg. I have garnished with a few pomegranates for holiday color. Optional: add a splash of rum.

COCONUT SNOWBALLS

Ingredients

1 & ¾ cups unsweetened shredded coconut, divided
2 tsp melted coconut oil
3 Tbsp organic, raw honey
2 Tbsp unsweetened coconut milk
½ tsp pure vanilla extract
½ tsp ground cinnamon
⅛ tsp sea salt

Instructions

Melt the coconut oil and place it with 1 cup of the shredded coconut in a food processor. Process on high speed, scraping down the sides periodically until it reaches a paste-like consistency. (It does not have to be completely smooth like coconut butter; some texture is good.)

Add the honey, coconut milk, vanilla, cinnamon, and salt and process until well combined. Add ½ cup plus 2 Tablespoons of shredded coconut and pulse until just combined.

Shape the mixture into 12 (1-inch) balls and coat with the remaining 2 Tablespoons of shredded coconut. Refrigerate for at least an hour and up to 5 days. Eat cold or bring to room temperature before eating, depending on personal preference.

I hope you all enjoy the magic of the season and the company of friends and family.  Before you attend your holiday parties be sure to have a small snack so that you may make good decisions when you arrive. Take your favorite healthy dish and share the gift of health with others.  Enjoy focusing on the conversation and eat slowly!  If all else fails, take it easy on yourself and go for a walk after dinner!

I would love to hear some of your favorite recipes!

Joy Vale
December 18, 2016

Functional Endocrinology of Ohio

Akron: 2800 S. Arlington Road,
Akron, Ohio 44312 (330) 644-5488
Cleveland: 6200 Rockside Woods Blvd., Ste. 100, Independence, Ohio 44131 (216) 236-0060
Dr. Keith S. Ungar, Dr. Andrew Kender, Dr. Robert Nichols, Chiropractic Physicians

To schedule an appointment, click here.

Megan. “Blueberry Turkey Breakfast Sausage – A Dash of Megnut.” A Dash of Megnut. N.p., 18 Oct. 2016. Web. 05 Dec. 2016.

“A Little Christmas Spirit.” Amber. “Coconut Snowballs – Dessert Now, Dinner Later!” Dessert Now,

Dinner Later! N.p., 11 Jan. 2016. Web. 29 Nov. 2016.Flickr. Yahoo!, n.d. Web. 29 Nov. 2016.

Christine. “Dairy Free, Egg Free Nog – 24 Carrot Kitchen.” 24 Carrot Kitchen. N.p., 10 Nov. 2016. Web. 29 Nov. 2016.

Meme. “Hummus Chicken Salad.” Living Well Kitchen. N.p., 09 July 2016. Web. 29 Nov. 2016.

https://www.facebook.com/CotterCrunch. “Easy Gluten Free Spiced Hot Fruit Bake.” Cotter Crunch. N.p., 01 Dec. 2016. Web. 05 Dec. 2016.

“Chicken and Asparagus Lemon Stir Fry | Skinnytaste.” Skinnytaste. N.p., 28 Mar. 2016. Web. 05 Dec. 2016.

Livinglovingpaleo. “Buffalo Chicken Dip – Living Loving Paleo.” Living Loving Paleo. N.p., 29 Jan. 2016. Web. 05 Dec. 2016.

Don’t Be A Grinch – Keep Your Brain Healthy This Holiday Season!

landon

Three Key Components for Optimal Brain Health

It’s here folks!  The poinsettia are in bloom, the Christmas lights are glowing, and the smell of pine and cinnamon are in the air.  Some of us can’t help but get excited about the holiday season, but with the excitement of the season comes a variety of stressors.  Old man winter kisses the air, seasonal affective disorder touches us all on the north shores of Ohio, and let’s face it- there’s a certain trepidation looming ahead as we prepare to spend the holidays with family.  Stress affects us all in different ways.  The part of the body that takes the brunt of the abuse is our brains, especially our frontal cortex.  This is the part of the brain underneath your forehead which deals with the daily problems and solutions to complex issues.  The front part of our brain is what allows us to do mathematics, rationalize, analyze, hypothesize and visualize but most importantly it gets the creative juices flowing & allows us to express our inner Einstein.  This part of the brain dictates who we are, what we’re about & how we express ourselves.  Are you a “Tiny Tim” or “Scrooge” this Holiday Season?  How about this year instead of letting the Grinch come out in your brain, turn those follies into jingle bell jollies and get in the spirit this Christmas season.

“He’s making a list, He’s checking it twice….” How do you think Santa Claus keeps those Christmas wishes organized for the good boys and girls of the world?  Well, I’m sure he has an exceptionally large frontal cortex, which, controls executive function.  Of course, making a list is one recommendation this holiday season.  If you rely solely on your brain capacity alone to remember all those holiday details, you’re bound to forget something.  Making that list encourages left-brain function of the frontal cortex.

When you break it all down, the brain needs three things: oxygen, glucose, and stimulation.  It seems like this time of year it’s very easy to get “all wrapped up” in the holiday frenzy, so I urge you to support that brain with the fuel it needs to survive the holiday madness.  So just breathe.  It is easy to get caught up in a sympathetic state of breathing.  Have you ever noticed your breath during stressful times? If not, stop and observe what is going on with your body in a stressed state.  Typically, you use a very small percentage of breathing capacity when stressed.  It is important to understand that the lungs have three lobes:  upper, middle, and lower lobes.  We rarely use the upper and lower lobes and are out of our comfort zones when we do so.  A variety of exercises can make you use those lobes, such as burst exercises or simple breathing exercises.

The latest research proves that burst exercises are some of the best exercises to combat some of the most degenerative brain conditions such as Parkinson’s disease.  A burst exercise essentially takes all that you have, to propel your body through the active motion you are trying to complete.  For example, when I go for a jog, I set my repeat timer for every two minutes.  When the timer goes off I sprint with all that I’ve got for 30 seconds and recover with a slow jog for the next 90 seconds.  So every two minutes I am picking up the intensity to essentially maximize the capacity that my body can handle.  By the end of thirty seconds, I am completely winded and it takes every bit of the 90 seconds to recover before the next BURST.  This is just one example of a burst type exercise.  There are so many things you can do and I urge you to do as many as you can and as often as you can.  I would be willing to bet it will decrease stress on your brain.  Let’s use common sense here though folks, so if your body is not ready to hit the streets running as I explained, then you must complete an exercise that is within your body’s safe capacities.  If you do not feel comfortable advising yourself or if you’re uncertain about your limitations, then consult your physician before completing any exercise.

How about glucose for the brain?  The brain’s main fuel source is glucose, but can also survive on ketones.  If you want to know more about how the brain functions on ketones, then check out some of my previous blogs.  Glucose is derived from the foods we eat.  It is important not to overload the brain with glucose.  Too much of anything is bad for us.  So, when the holiday treats present, try not to overdo it.  If you know you are going to indulge, then combat those calories with exercise.  It all ties together.  If you exercise, you get oxygen.  If you exercise you help balance your blood sugars.  And if you exercise, you are stimulated.  This requires all the neurological connections in the brain to work together in harmony to complete the task.

Other forms of stimulation for holiday balance are playing games.  Whether you have young children at home or you are lone wolf around the holiday season, there is no reason you can’t increase the blood flow to those vital areas of the brain with a variety of games.  You could do a memory game to stimulate the hippocampal region of the temporal lobe to create plasticity to the short-term memory area of the brain.  You can do Sudoku to support the analytical left-brain and complete those tedious little puzzles.  How about grabbing a coloring book of winter scenes to fire that right brain through creative activities?  Whatever it is, just take some time to play among the holiday frenzy.   For some of you that aren’t as faint hearted, go out and find that pickup game.  The winter season is the perfect time for games like indoor soccer, basketball or volleyball.  Start by looking around your local YMCA or other gym facilities in the area for action.  I use a website called Gamesnake to find local pickups in the area.

So, I leave you with one key phrase.  “Use it or lose it.”  The brain is such a precious organ to waste.  Why not treat it right this holiday season with a few of the tips recommended by one of your favorite Chiropractors.  Keep Warm and Keep Happy.   Merry Christmas!

Dr. Andrew Kender III DC
Dec. 14, 2016

Functional Endocrinology of Ohio

Akron: 2800 S. Arlington Road, Akron, Ohio 44312 (330) 644-5488
Cleveland: 6200 Rockside Woods Blvd., Ste. 100, Independence, Ohio 44131 (216) 236-0060
Dr. Keith S. Ungar, Dr. Andrew Kender, Dr. Robert Nichols, Chiropractic Physicians

To schedule an appointment, click here.